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Ratings and Reviews by IFforL2

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Escape from the Man-Sized Cabinet, by The Late Show with Stephen Colbert
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Ecdysis, by Peter Nepstad
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Indigo, by Emily Short
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Blue Lacuna, by Aaron A. Reed
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Psychomanteum, by Hanon Ondricek
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Beyond, by Roberto Grassi, Paolo Lucchesi, and Alessandro Peretti
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Vespers, by Jason Devlin
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The Lesson of the Tortoise, by G. Kevin Wilson

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
Out of Touch, June 30, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
This well-received story pretends to have Asian influence but is remarkably western and male oriented. It should be no secret that cheating is culturally different in rural China, urban China, and western pop-culture. The scene where (Spoiler - click to show) the husband catches his wife in his own bed with his employee seems more like a scene from the old TV show Friends than a plausible event in in set China. In reality, in pre-Revolutionary and post-Revolutionary China, women, not men are undeniably the overwhelming victims, not the perpetrators, of cheating. When a woman does cheat, and is caught, her husband, the divorce courts of her government, and her neighbors will all ensure that her punishment is far greater than her 'crime.' Taiwan is little better, especially now recent court decisions have ensured that women do not have the right to safety. (People who attack rapists in the act are punished more severely than the rapists themselves!)

A story of a Chinese man who is the poor helpless victim of adultery is about as preposterous as a story of an American white man who is the poor helpless victim of racism by his African-American neighbours. Moreover, (Spoiler - click to show)three men team up to destroy one woman using absolute authority over another woman!

But I understand we all like a story of East Asian flavor that reads like a fortune cookie and ignores reality. I'm sure the author has read the take of several Western authors on Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist thought. HE probably did not intend any of the bitter irony that I'm reading into HIS story.

In a few days, I'll probably be embarrassed by something or everything I've written here and delete this review. I'm normally spineless. But I'll post it now while outrage fuels my, probably unjustified, courage.

Friendly Foe, by Mike Sousa
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The Island of Doctor Wooby, by Ryan Veeder
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Cactus Blue Motel, by Astrid Dalmady
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Como la Gente Civilizada | Like Civilized People, by Florencia Rumpel Rodriguez

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
A Non-Fiction Twine that Stings, June 8, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
While it's unwise to judge a book by its cover, I tend to make inferences about an IF by its development system. TADS is for computer people, Inform7 is for very precise non-programmers, and textadventures.co.uk is mostly for youths.

Twine is unlike other choice-based IF systems because it has a history of providing an digital literary voice for oppressed communities. What I like best about this example is that it publishes real accounts. The traditional way to publish short first-hand accounts and brief primary sources is by collecting excerpts into anthology books. Here, in contrast, the various accounts are triggered by the reader's choices. (Spoiler - click to show)Even better, the final choice leads the reader to an activist website! So the Interactive Non-Fiction continues with the reader's real-world choice of what to do about this issue, starting today!

Two questions for the comments:
1) Are these eyewitness accounts harmed by the second-person narration? These happened to real women, not to the fictitious IF character named "You."

2) Is it unjust to present a dangerous incident of harassment with a clickable set of options? (Or even with a parser's command line, for that matter?)
(Spoiler - click to show)I was offended when one of the women was being attacked and I was given the option to "react" or "wait." I'm SO glad that neither choice led to more abuse towards her than the other. But putting that choice there strongly suggests, to me at least, that the victim is somehow responsible for what happened to her. She should have made the other choice. Then again, I could just be mentally imposing some of the unfair Twine-game choices I've seen onto this literary work. Again, neither choice was a wrong choice. I'm just uncomfortable that it looks like she has to make the right choice.

I read this piece once in English and three times in Castilian. The English translation is quite good, but uses a tamer, less stinging choice of words. If you know some Spanish, I recommend the original. (Even if you have to use a dictionary. It's short.)

El Cantar de Romanfredo, by Aryekaix
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Everybody Dies, by Jim Munroe
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De Baron, by Victor Gijsbers
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Dead Meat in the Pit, by Christina Nordlander
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El Archipiélago, by Depresiv

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Fun in the way graphic adventures are fun., June 2, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
This Spanish work does a good job of being at once a game and a story. It was quite fun, but it felt like one of those graphic point-and-click adventures. The game world is medium sized; I didn't need a map, but I would have moved more quickly with one. Each chapter consists of an initial choice-based backdrop scene followed by a puzzle-solving exploration session.

Again, this game really was fun, but it could have been even more fun with consistent implementation. (Spoiler - click to show)Each magical device only works once to solve a specific puzzle. You can't tinker with the cauldron, the garden, or anything. After I solved the growing fruit puzzle, I tried to do it again, but the game just asked, "Why would you want to do that?" I tried putting other things like water and a rabbit into the cauldron and even lit the fire. Nothing even cooked! That rabbit is a survivor!

Most of the puzzles are standard for parser-games. Some of the puzzles use ascii graphics to imitate graphic adventure type puzzles. Whether or not such puzzles belong in IF, it would be courteous for an author who employs them to hyperlink the controls. The act of typing a command just to make a minuscule adjustment started to feel tedious after a while.

I considered one of the normal puzzles unfair. (Spoiler - click to show)Any interaction with the eagle suggests that she can't communicate with you and she's dangerous to touch. But lo and behold, you suddenly can communicate with her and touch her only when one puzzle requires it. When I consult an in-game walkthrough, I believe I should think, "Oh, duh. I would have thought of that if I'd given it enough time and patience." With this puzzle, I felt irritated that the game steered me away from the correct solution at every prod.

For Spanish language learners, I'd rate the vocabulary as roughly intermediate level. However, the work includes a warning that it is not for readers younger than 14. A walkthrough is accessible within the game.

The Compass Rose, by Yoon Ha Lee and Peter Berman
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Wiz Lair: La Guarida del Hechicero, by Grendelkhan
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HUNTING UNICORN, by Chandler Groover
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The Queen's Menagerie, by Chandler Groover
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Marco Polo, by Baltasar el arquero
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Rogue of the Multiverse, by C.E.J. Pacian
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Whitefield Academy of Witchcraft, by Steph Cherrywell
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It, by Emily Boegheim
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汉初, by 郝景芳 (Jingfang Hao)
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El Museo de las Conscienscias, by Xpktro, Mel Hython, Santiago Eximeno, Grendel Khan, Urbatin, Depresiv
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brevity quest, by Chris Longhurst
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Data Doesn't Lie, by Jim Munroe
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La cuarta especie, by Laura Baleztena
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Cacahuetes, Sal y Aceite, by José Baltasar García Perez-Schofield
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El gorrón del tren, by José Manuel Ferrer Ortiz
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A Room With A Couch 2: Dino Adventure, by Byron
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Underground Dungeon, by Ben Ehrlich
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Ether, by MathBrush
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Pretty Sure, by Jim Munroe
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You Will Select a Decision, by Brendan Patrick Hennessy
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spondre, by Jay Nabonne
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Chlorophyll, by Steph Cherrywell
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Seedship, by John Ayliff
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Harmonic Time-Bind Ritual Symphony, by Ben Kidwell and Maevele Straw
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“His Majesty’s Ship Impetuous” , by Jimmy Maher
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La Lagune de Montaigne, by Caleb Wilson
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El asesino durmiente, by Candy Von Bitter
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Inhumane, by Andrew Plotkin
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La Mansión, by Incanus
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Orpheus and Eurydice, by Ethan Chu, Whitley Marshall, John Rendleman, Abhishek Das, Courtney Brady
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What Fuwa Bansaku Found, by Chandler Groover
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中正恐慌 THE CCU HORROR, by Seth Silverstone

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
只對特定的觀眾上訴, February 20, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
這段恐怖視覺小說設在台灣的大學校園。寫作風格是還可以的, 有點陳詞濫調。有很長的無選擇的敘事,特別是在前面。後來一些選擇導致突然失敗,雖然可能把故事帶到兩個不同的結局。

This horror CYOA is set at a particular university campus in Taiwan. For this reason, it may appeal only to a very specific audience. The quality of writing is not bad, but unremarkable. There are long stretches of narrative without options, especially at the beginning. Later, there are a couple of binary choices, one leading to sudden death, and the other continuing the narrative. A few consequential choices do exist, and it is possible to find two different endings.

呃啊! Capybara, by Sirius, kidkidkid, and Capy
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Staying Put, by verityvirtue
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Forrajeo, by Incanus
Immediately entertaining and easy to pick up., February 10, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
Although this is not Incanus' most polished game, it was my personal favorite until I found the time to play Ofrenda a la Pincoya. It's also the one I'd recommend for Spanish language learners--The parser never misunderstood me and didn't expect me to go through extremely detailed procedures.

Aunque este juego no es el más finamente construido de las obras de Incanus, todavía era mi favorita, hasta que leí Ofrenda a la Pincoya. También este es el que recomendaria para los que están aprendiendo el Español.

Ofrenda a la Pincoya, by Incanus
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Escape | 逃出去: A text adventure game for Chinese learners, by Olle Linge and Kevin Bullaughey
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Andromeda Apocalypse — Extended Edition, by Marco Innocenti
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The Poisoned Soup | 有毒之湯, by Steven Dong

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
More successful at puzzles than the average visual novel., February 9, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
Although I enjoy many works of interactive literature just as well as text adventure puzzlers, I observe that puzzles help language learners to read IF with more focus, care, and investment. Therefore, I find it unfortunate that few East Asian visual novels include puzzles. Those that do tend to limit themselves to instant death by wrong choice. The Poisoned Soup is a rare piece in that the fluently bilingual author is well-read in a variety of IF genres. These range from parser-based puzzle games, to parser-based literature, to choice-based (and basically linear) East Asian visual novels.(Spoiler - click to show) Steven Dong intentionally makes it difficult to select all the right choices in the first play-through. However, wrong choices don't usually lead to instant death without clear warnings. Rather, most wrong choices cause trauma to the PC. As I made progress in the game/work, Dong's method caused, in me at least, a sense of desperation and increasing cautiousness, as well as personal investment in the PC's lot.

I would have to say that this is currently my second favorite Mandarin game after 逃出去 | Escape.



Jacqueline, Jungle Queen!, by Steph Cherrywell
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Remanence, by Stephanie Chan
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Draculaland, by Robin Johnson
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Random Life 2, by Gideon Castro
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The First Day, by Brett Chalupa
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Room Serial, by merricart
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Bigger Than You Think, by Andrew Plotkin
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A Friend to Light Your Way, by verityvirtue

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
verityvirtue at her best, January 18, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
This story includes a light puzzle and a bit of creepiness. What I really love about it is the spot-on cultural setting. Right at the start, you can choose between two very realistic and quintessential types of Asian daughters for the PC. As you enter the scene, every detail, from conversations to "rooms" genuinely feels like modern rural China or Taiwan. (Please forgive the comparison! It's not politically motivated!) The author could have kept this as a very well-written slice-of-life. But the puzzle and the creepy plot do a good job of gamifying it all.

Tree and Star, by Paul Lee
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30 kilogrammes, by verityvirtue
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the uncle who works for nintendo, by michael lutz
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Hide a pachyderm!, by Simon Deimel
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A Dark Room, by Michael Townsend

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Google Translate is great!, January 17, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
Related reviews: Easy English
This minimalist idle game is available in lots and lots of languages. Not-so-unfortunately, after reading through the start of the Mandarin and Spanish versions, I must deduce that they were created using Google Translate. (I may be wrong, and I'd gladly eat a humble pie from Michael Townshend.) That's actually not so bad, as this game is one of a handful that make the most of a few short phrases. Julian Churchill's Tiny Text Adventure is another.

Firebird, by Bonnie Montgomery
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Whom The Telling Changed, by Aaron A. Reed
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Trapped in Time, by Simon Christiansen
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KING OF BEES IN FANTASY LAND, by Brendan Patrick Hennessy
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The Zen Garden, by Privateer

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Perfect Use of the Medium, January 16, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
One of the things I love about text adventures.co.uk is the unabashedly amateur nature of many of the pieces. But it is nice to see near perfect implementation, and this is one example. In my opinion, this game is as entertaining, sublime and meticulous as many of the IFComp winners that I've played. It is also one of those games you can continue to "play" away from the computer during an interminable meeting or while proctoring final exams.

No Quiero Verla, by Comely

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Potentially powerful, not perfectly implemented, January 16, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
This story explores the PC's thoughts and memories, rather than geography. Compared to other IFs of the same concept (e.g. verityvirtue's Staying Put), this is relatively under-implemented, which kept me mindful of the parser. (Spoiler - click to show)For an example, talk to Claire.The author clearly didn't want the reader to go in that direction, but a more natural response would have helped me stay immersed.

Beet the Devil, by Carolyn VanEseltine
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Masks, by lioninthetrees
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Sacrifice, by Hamish McIntyre
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Get Lost!, by S. Woodson
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Walker's Rift, by verityvirtue
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Aventura Pirata, by Mauricio Diaz Garcia

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Still hoping to get started., January 14, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
I was quite excited to stumble upon this game. I like having parallel texts available for language learners. Also, Scott Adams' games nearly always feature very short narrative segments and generally low-level vocabulary. For both reasons, this could potentially be a valuable resource for the language classroom. Unfortunately, I encountered bugs early on. It is impossible to "coger libros" to find the secret passage. I'd be happy to change my rating to four or five stars if such bugs are fixed. The translation is natural, not overly literal. The background and visual effects match the original game, creating (at least for me) a warm fuzzy nostalgia.

Earth and Sky, by Paul O'Brian
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Transfer, by Tod Levi
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Li You's Secret Admirer, by Mrs. Pollard

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Very basic vocabulary, yet entertaining., January 12, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
The TPRS method/tradition in the L2 classroom gives students total freedom to further the narrative in response to the teacher's prompting. Mrs. Pollard may be familiar with TPRS, because every option prompt in this story allows the student/reader to move the story in a new direction. There are no dead-ends, and no loose ends. Vocabulary is limited to HSK level 1, meaning that a first-year student in an HSK standardised course would be able to read it.

Balaclava, by Nahuel Denegri
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Ajiaco, by Matthias Conrady, Carolina Arciniegas
Interactive, but not literature, fiction, or game, January 12, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
This bilingual point-and-click manual is a pretty cool cultural demonstration via the internet. It's not text-based, nor is it interactive fiction. But it would be a useful teaching tool in the Spanish language classroom both for its cultural demonstration and language options.

Pan de ajo, by Incanus
Household vocabulary in a fantasy context, January 12, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
The first puzzles of this work feature routine usage of household vocabulary without guess-the-verb difficulties. The vocabulary becomes more complex as as progress is made, just as in most literature. I'd recommend this story for students who are learning household and food-related vocabulary. The vampire theme helps to enhance the mood of what might otherwise be an academic exercise. (Spoiler - click to show)In this game, the player is asked to prepare a snack. Many language teachers are familiar with the humorous mini-lesson where the teacher asks the students to make a PBJ sandwich. The first two puzzles are similar, but, obviously, reading-base. The parser, of course, takes the role of the teacher either understanding or misunderstanding the students' very specific directions.

Resaca, by Voet
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El Protector, by Incanus
Literature with puzzles., January 12, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
Several people have told me that this is one of their favorite works by Incanus. I certainly enjoyed exploring and reading his descriptions and narrative. I was frustrated by guess-the-verb difficulty in two of the first puzzles. I finally found the right word in the first. However, in the second, I did not find the right verb even after reading the "pistas." The quality of the writing is such that I may actually consult a walk-through, simply because I enjoy the reading. I would not recommend this for an intermediate-level Spanish language learner unless she were already quite good at text adventures.

El aprendiz de Layton, by Unknown
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The Skyscraper and the Scar, by Diego Freire, Ruber Eaglenest
Bien escrita, pero con pocas ramas. | A well-written CYOA with few choices., January 11, 2017
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
Esta historia permite al usuario a escoger inglés y o español, una cosa útil para aprender este o ese idioma. Los elecciones disponibles no parecen resultar en muchas variaciones o resultados.

This story allows the reader to read in English or Spanish. I consider this somewhat useful for learning languages. However, the available choices don't result in a great variety of results. Then again, the authors' goal may simply be to enjoy several perspectives on the same story.

Thy Dungeonman II, by Videlectrix
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Thy Dungeonman 3, by Videlectrix
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Thy Dungeonman, by Videlectrix
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Victorian Detective, by Peter Carlson
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Identity, by Dave Bernazzani
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The Pawn, by Rob Steggles, Peter Kemp, Hugh Steers, Ken Gordon, and Geoff Quilley
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The Axolotl Project, by Samantha Vick
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Untold Riches, by Jason Ermer
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Adventure (BBC Master Welcome Disc, 1986), by Anonymous
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1181, by ricassofiction and notgojira
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Open Sorcery, by Abigail Corfman
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Toby's Nose, by Chandler Groover
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Rastros, by Incanus
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Ariadne in Aeaea, by Victor Ojuel
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Birdland, by Brendan Patrick Hennessy
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Andromeda Awakening - The Final Cut, by Marco Innocenti
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Aotearoa, by Matt Wigdahl
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The Tiniest Room, by Erik108
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Mouth of Ashes, by verityvirtue

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Write what you know., December 8, 2016
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
I love hiking through the mountains of southern Taiwan, and I appreciate the way Mouth of Ashes creates a long walk for the PC. I make up stories like this for my kids to keep up the pace and distract them from the potential discomfort of stamina exercise. I'll have to use this plot next time we head up Mt. Du-li.

The God Device, by Andy Joel
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Castle of the Red Prince, by C.E.J. Pacian
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Superluminal Vagrant Twin, by C.E.J. Pacian
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Midnight. Swordfight., by Chandler Groover
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Arthur, by Bob Bates
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my father's long, long legs, by michael lutz
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Moquette, by Alex Warren
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Blighted Isle, by Eric Eve
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If You Go Down in the Woods Today..., by peter@gameenglish

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Reading Level, February 11, 2016
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
The lowest English level of this game has an average grade level of about 2. It should be easily understood by 7 to 8 year olds. Although this game may seem to target a younger audience, I've had Taiwanese high schoolers ROFL at this game. It's surprisingly cute and suddenly startling.

Readability Indices:

Flesch Kincaid Reading Ease 101.4
Flesch Kincaid Grade Level 0.6
Gunning Fog Score 2.9
SMOG Index 2.4
Coleman Liau Index 5.9
Automated Readability Index -1.1

(Source: Read-able.com)

Escape from Simian Island, by peter@gameenglish
Reading Level, February 11, 2016
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
Related reviews: Reading Level
This game has an average grade level of about 6. It should be easily understood by 11 to 12 year olds. My students find this game to be more difficult, but also more fun than "A Day at the Beach" by the same author.

Readability Indices:

Flesch Kincaid Reading Ease 85.6
Flesch Kincaid Grade Level 5
Gunning Fog Score 7.2
SMOG Index 4.5
Coleman Liau Index 7.7
Automated Readability Index 4.7

(Source: read-able.com)

A Day at the Beach, by peter@gameenglish

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Reading Level, February 11, 2016
by IFforL2 (East Asia)
Related reviews: Reading Level
This game has an average grade level of about 5. It should be easily understood by 10 to 11 year olds. My students usually like this game less than "Escape from Simian Island" by the same author. But they appreciate the snarky humor; I usually hear some giggling as they read.

Readability Indices:

Flesch Kincaid Reading Ease 90.3
Flesch Kincaid Grade Level 4.1
Gunning Fog Score 6.4
SMOG Index 3.7
Coleman Liau Index 6.8
Automated Readability Index 3.7

(Source: read-able.com)

RPG-ish, by Stuart Lilford
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The Intercept, by Jon Ingold and inkle
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Galatea, by Emily Short
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Lost Pig, by Admiral Jota
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Babel, by Ian Finley
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The Abyss, by dacharya64
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The Mayor and the Machine, by J. Marie
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A Tale of the Cave, by Snoother
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Castle, Forest, Island, Sea, by Hide&Seek
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The Matter of the Monster, by Andrew Plotkin
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Age of Fable, by James Hutchings
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SABBAT, by Eva
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Ex Nihilo, by Juhana Leinonen
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Three Dragons, by Tim Samoff
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With Those We Love Alive, by Porpentine and Brenda Neotenomie
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howling dogs, by Porpentine
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Blue Chairs, by Chris Klimas
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The Fire Tower, by Jacqueline A. Lott
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All Things Devours, by half sick of shadows
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Beta Tester, by Darren Ingram
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Tales of the Traveling Swordsman, by Mike Snyder
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Counterfeit Monkey, by Emily Short
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Zork I, by Marc Blank and Dave Lebling
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Conan Kill Everything, by Ian Haberkorn
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Lock & Key, by Adam Cadre
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The Edifice, by Lucian P. Smith
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City of Secrets, by Emily Short
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Metamorphoses, by Emily Short
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Alabaster, by John Cater, Rob Dubbin, Eric Eve, Elizabeth Heller, Jayzee, Kazuki Mishima, Sarah Morayati, Mark Musante, Emily Short, Adam Thornton, Ziv Wities
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Hunter, in Darkness, by Andrew Plotkin
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