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Story File
The latest release
For all systems. To play, you'll need a glulx interpreter - visit Brass Lantern for download links.
Walkthrough
by the author
Walkthrough and maps
by David Welbourn
Story File v1
2017 IF Competition release
For all systems. To play, you'll need a glulx interpreter - visit Brass Lantern for download links.

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The Wand

by Arthur DiBianca profile

2017

(based on 23 ratings)
6 member reviews

About the Story

Explore the wizard Bartholloco's castle with the help of a versatile magic wand. Can you overcome his challenge? Can you levitate a rock? Can you slice a baltavakia?

(Puzzle-oriented and family friendly.)

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: October 1, 2017
Current Version: Unknown
Development System: Inform 7
IFID: 12BC8883-FC23-4680-94CC-999165CF8D5A
TUID: 2jil5vbxmbv8riv1

Awards

11th Place - 23rd Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (2017)

Editorial Reviews

Dhakajack
The title says it all. This story is about the wand, figuring out how to use it and then doing so. There’s minimal setup and character development and almost no dialogue, but it’s a darn good puzzle game.
See the full review

Renga in Blue
As one might expect with a wand, this is generic fantasy: you’re supposed to make your way through obstacles in a castle and gather enough new spells (things like “levitate” and “fire”) to escape. In a way, the presence of spells makes this the most expansive verb list Arthur DiBianca has ever used, since each spell is a verb of sorts. The lack of ability to TAKE things means even the simplest of activities gets turned into a spell-related puzzle.
See the full review

The Breakfast Review
The puzzles start off easy and straightforward, getting more complex towards the end. They're just hard enough, I think, to elicit that all-important sense of achievement that puzzle-solving has to evoke without crossing the line into being frustrating.
See the full review

Doug's World
Although the wand can be programmed to cast a variety of useful spells, the player only acquires knowledge of these spells incrementally. The pacing is appropriate to this type of game: the player acquires a new spell, finds a need to use it immediately, and then has to apply it elsewhere in a less obvious situation. With increasing power of knowledge, the puzzles also become more challenging. By mid-game often a whole series of spells must be cast to solve a problem. The final challenge is delightfully and absurdly complex, requiring the player to invoke nearly every spell they've learned in a carefully timed sequence.
See the full review

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Member Reviews

5 star:
(5)
4 star:
(11)
3 star:
(5)
2 star:
(1)
1 star:
(1)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 6
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Most Helpful Member Reviews


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Two games in one, November 16, 2017
by Denk
Related reviews: inform
This was my favorite 2017 Ifcomp game. I don't see how to make a meaningful review of this one, without touching on the hidden content, which is more than half the game. If you cannot find the hidden content, check out David Welbourn's excellent walkthrough.

The Wand is a very polished puzzle-based text adventure, where the player seeks out a challenge at Bartholloco's secluded castle. The player is not allowed to touch anything in the castle, except from the wand, he/she is given at the beginning of the game. Luckily the wand is magical and can be set to 1000 different color combinations. The wand has different abilities depending on the chosen color combination. Unfortunately you do not know which combinations are useful, but clues to this are placed around the castle.

The apparent challenge of the game has a very nice level of difficulty and can be completed in approximately 2 hours. However, (Spoiler - click to show)if you restart and approach the game with your knowledge from your first play-through, you may find a much deeper and more involved challenge.

It is during this deeper challenge you will come to realize how well thought out the magic system actually is. Also, the ending of this deeper challenge is much better than that of the first challenge.


I don't think a pure puzzle game comes much better than this.

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Whimsical, rock-solid puzzle game with a stripped-down Enchanter mechanic, October 5, 2017
by prevtenet (Texas)
It's become something of an IFComp tradition: the rock-solid puzzlefest by Arthur DiBianca, with a cleverly stripped-down parser and only the barest veneer of a story. Art's first entry was the unique but tepidly received Excelsior, followed by Grandma Bethlinda's Variety Box, which earned positive reviews and attracted so much traffic it nearly crashed the IFComp server. 2016's entry, Inside the Facility, was a novel movement-only game that won the Miss Congeniality award and received two XYZZY nods (Best Puzzles and Best Individual Puzzle).

So what did Arthur DiBianca put forward in 2017? The Wand, and it's pretty good. The Wand revisits Excelsior's seemingly bland milieu - "a wizard sets up puzzles in a tower" - but this time with far better results.

One of Excelsior's problems was that it wasn't always clear what the "use" verb would actually do. ("use statue"?) The Wand adopts the Enchanter mechanic, where you progressively learn spells that interact in interesting ways, but strips it down to *just* the spells with no other verbs except for movement. This creates a very effective experience where it's always clear what you're attempting to do, but the consequences of your actions can be unexpected.

Another of Excelsior's problems was the lack of a story or any real context for the puzzles; I kept wondering "why is this here?", and the ending felt like a disappointing afterthought. The Wand avoids this by being entirely upfront about its concept. I'm reminded of Emily Short's "Action and Interaction": "I’ve come to think that one of the jobs of a work of IF is to teach its player - constantly, in every kind of feedback - what sorts of interactions are appropriate to the game." This idea permeates The Wand, from how the concept is presented to how puzzles are hinted. The game continually and progressively teaches you what to expect, while offering some little surprises along the way. (Case in point: the brilliant way the game handles the "use" verb.)

In many ways this is the driving idea of the limited-parser movement, of which DiBianca is a vanguard: people are quite happy to play by the rules of the game you establish, but when there's a mismatch between their own idea of the rules and the game's idea of the rules, they can be disappointed. Thus, stripping down the parser and saying upfront "yeah, don't expect a story" can actually increase immersion. (Indeed, going into the game with no expectation of context or story made those elements pleasantly surprise me where they did appear.)

I must admit I am not a full convert to the minimalist school. The call of the verb is strong. But there is much of value in this way of thinking, and The Wand does it well.

Other strengths: DiBianca's writing is terse, but whimsical and evocative. (What is a baltavakia, and how do you slice one? I'm still not really sure I know, but the mental images that section conjured were fantastic.) Puzzle design is strong, mostly of the satisfying "oh! now I can do *that*!" variety. Puzzles are often "themed" and make sense within the context of their environment, which is small enough to keep everything nearby but large enough to offer a few different avenues to explore if you get stuck. Hinting is strong, with a mix of obvious solutions and head-scratchers - although I did have to check the walkthrough to realize I could (Spoiler - click to show)just walk past the dragon. The adorable, adorable dragon.

I do have a few minor critiques, e.g. I'm not sure about the wand mechanic. Spells take two turns to input, and wand settings are hard to remember without writing them down, especially since the color abbreviations can be unexpected. I do wonder if Enchanter-style magic words would work better, but as a mental concept, "one wand and two verbs" has its perks.

IMHO, what would have made this game even better is 1) deeper spell interaction, and 2) deeper worldbuilding. You can levitate rocks; what if you could levitate *anything*? The wizard has a pet kimpert; why? But I acknowledge that these thoughts are driven more by my personal affinity for games like Counterfeit Monkey than by any practical considerations.

Note: This game has hidden content that is not mentioned in the walkthrough.

Fun, good range of puzzles - could do with better vocab, February 11, 2018
On the whole, this was very enjoyable. The puzzles were mostly straightforward and fun with a good few trickier ones further in.

I have one particular gripe. Yes, I know it warns me it is a game with limited verbs ('examine' 'use' and very few others) but the key reason for having excellent modern parsers is to avoid parser-'don't understand'-Hell and give a rich experience to the reader/player.

For example:

I'm in a room, with a closed wooden door and a wand in my hand.

I try 'open door' and I get "That's not a command I recognise"
I try 'wave wand' and I get "That's not a command I recognise"

I nearly stopped playing at that point.

Yes, I can see the reason for limiting the verbs and, yes (without giving spoilers), it does eliminate a lot of wasted parser-Hell later but there were plenty of other examples of 'examine' not working with things described in rooms.

IF should try to give a reasonable response to everything that can be seen/described, so I think it needed a bit of work sorting that out.

In the end, though, I'm glad I stayed with it because it was a very good little adventure and I enjoyed it enough to give it an extra star.

See All 6 Member Reviews

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Polls

The following polls include votes for The Wand:

For your consideration: XYZZY-eligible Puzzles of 2017 by MathBrush
This is for suggesting games released in 2017 which you think might be worth considering for Best Overall Puzzles in the XYZZY awards. This is not a zeroth-round nomination. The category will still be text-entry, and games not mentioned...

For your consideration: XYZZY-eligible Implementation of 2017 by MathBrush
This is for suggesting games released in 2017 which you think might be worth considering for Best Implementation in the XYZZY awards. This is not a zeroth-round nomination. The category will still be text-entry, and games not mentioned...

For your consideration: XYZZY-eligible individual puzzles of 2017 by MathBrush
This is for suggesting games released in 2017 which you think might be worth considering for Best individual Puzzle in the XYZZY awards. This is not a zeroth-round nomination. The category will still be text-entry, and games not...

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This is version 12 of this page, edited by CMG on 16 April 2018 at 6:20pm. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item