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Moquette

by Alex Warren

2013

(based on 17 ratings)
4 member reviews

About the Story

Tuesday morning. London Underground. Hangover. Journey begins.

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: September 29, 2013
Current Version: 1
License: Freeware
Development System: Quest
IFID: FF2DA758-286E-4C47-B6F2-EB26BA2F7591
TUID: gk0diy1aawlqtun

Awards

15th Place - 19th Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (2013)

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Member Reviews

5 star:
(0)
4 star:
(4)
3 star:
(8)
2 star:
(4)
1 star:
(1)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 4
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Most Helpful Member Reviews


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Choices, December 3, 2013
by Simon Deimel (Germany)
I understand that opinions will differ on MOQUETTE.
The prose is exellent. I enjoyed reading it, despite some vulgar elements (I usually reject verbal abuse). As some critics already pointed out, I can just say the same: The beginning was a bit aimless, I did not understand what to do, and when the main encounter finally happened, I had the feeling that my choices actually had not made any difference. The author gets an extra praise for implementing each of the mentioned passengers in detail and rendering thoughts about them. The text effects were interesting.
All in all this is a well-crafted piece of interactive fiction, which put a focus on fiction rather than interactivity. Nevertheless I must say that the first part was somehow tedious and I wondered "when is something gonna happen?" too many times.
Note: I posted a similar review on the webpage of the game.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
At times frustrating, November 21, 2013
by streever (America)
I wasn't sure what I was doing or why. Ostensibly, I'm on my way to work, but my limited understanding of where I need to go and what train routes get me where left me feeling mostly frustrated.

Perhaps this game would work better with a map as a companion piece--perhaps not, because there doesn't seem to be any reason to go to any specific place. Essentially you wander the subway in a fashion similar to the classic Zork maze--there are areas and people to look at, but none of them advance you or get you anywhere.

I can't tell you why I switched lines, or why I swapped trains--as my protagonist said sometimes, "Or I could change to the Charing Cross branch. I could do that. There is nothing stopping me."

I found reading my protagonists stream-of-consciousness to be infectious. His sense of ennui and boredom made me wonder what I was doing and why I was bothering. I suspect this was the intention--but I found it frustrating. I prefer it when the emotions aren't told to me, but rather things I experience through good writing and plotting.

Finally, a twist occurs, but it is quite late in the narrative, and I had a hard time understanding what it was trying to tell me. It seems to be a meta-commentary, but I'm not sure on what--the nature of games, or a psychological statement? Ultimately, I was left wondering why my protagonist didn't just go into work, or get on a different train and go home to sleep off his hangover.

A fascinating journey through the London underground and memory, August 1, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: 15-30 minutes
This game reminds me for some reason of Michael Ende's Momo.

In any case, this is a quest hyperlink game that has you travelling on trains. You are on a subway line, you can wait or get off at each station, then travel on a new line in a new directions.

There are a dozen or more lines, with quite a few stations.

As you play, very good text effects begin to show up. A metastory appears.

There is unnecessary strong profanity; however, on Chrome, profanity filters filter it out.

See All 4 Member Reviews

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Moquette appears in the following Recommended Lists:

Surreal games on trains by MathBrush
There is an unusually large amount of surreal games on trains (maybe from the Dark Tower?). Here are the ones I can find.

Polls

The following polls include votes for Moquette:

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This list is for games either about travel or with travel as a major part of the plot or background. Stuff like being able to choose where you go from a relatively wide range of destinations, road trips, exploring a city or region as a...

Games with accurate (present or historical) settings by Emily Short
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This is version 3 of this page, edited by MathBrush on 25 July 2017 at 11:40am. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item