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This game requires an interpreter program - refer to the game's documentation for details.

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The Intercept

by Jon Ingold profile and inkle


Web Site

(based on 15 ratings)
2 member reviews

About the Story

Bletchley Park, 1942. A component from the Bombe machine, used to decode intercepted German messages, has gone missing. One of the cryptographers is waiting to be interviewed, under direst suspicion. Is he stupid enough to have attempted treason? Or is he clever enough to get away?

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: September 27, 2012
Current Version: 1
License: Free
Development System: inklewriter
Forgiveness Rating: Polite
IFID: Unknown
TUID: 6oq1zke93clq1me9


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Number of Reviews: 2
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Great quick diversion on a tablet or phone, September 30, 2012
by Hanon Ondricek (United States)
This CYOA is very nicely written with Inklewriter, which I tried out and gave high praise to. Inkle works well for moderate-sized conversation-based stories, and that's what this mostly is. A piece has gone missing from a code-breaking/encrypting machine and you might be responsible.

The bulk of the game is an interrogation, giving answers to questions that are posed to you. You often will get yes/no agree/disagree, often with a choice of lie/truth. The only downside to this is on your first playthrough you're the dumbest person in the room. Several crucial plot points are known to the protagonist and antagonist but the reader only learns what's actually happened after several random stabs at answering the questions. This is not an amnesia game, and the story does not shift based on your answers. It feels like a really good conversation section from a Mass Effect game if it were set in WW2. If this were an endgame to a slightly larger scenario it might not feel quite so trial-and-error.

I never did get the best ending, which might be a testament to the potential of inkle and CYOA, or it may mean that I tired out after giving the same sequence of yes-no-no-lie-yes-agree-yes-no to get to the part of the story that actually branches out and will not let you double back.

It's worth a try - I played this on a lunch break on my android device, and the text is very nicely formatted and readable with large finger-sized buttons for your choices.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Character-based fiction with a not terribly sympathetic character, October 3, 2012
by Sig (Olalla, WA, US)
Related reviews: inklewriter
Played on my Kindle keyboard. It was well-suited to the screen size and responsive; a good format for this work.

The game play consists largely of trying to guess your way through an interrogation; the protagonist might know the truth (must, since he has the option to lie), but the player is rather clueless. This feels somewhat like showing up to Chemistry when you stayed up all night studying for English.

Depending on your choices, your protagonist may be an unfortunate victim of circumstances or a rather unpleasant personality entirely; the actual events leading up to your interrogation don't change, but where you go from there determines things.

My major quibble after playing it through to a number of endings is that while the protagonist may be happiest with one branch, I found that I far preferred some of the "less than optimal" solutions. I just couldn't empathize very much with the character. In the less optimal solutions, you don't know as much about him and what you do know is morally ambiguous; in the "winning" solutions (that I've found; perhaps there are others), I knew him better and liked him far less.

Worth playing through, for certain, and a good demonstration of inklewriter and kindliser on the presentation end, but the story itself left me a little cold.

If you enjoyed The Intercept...

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This is version 5 of this page, edited by salty-horse on 21 March 2014 at 3:55pm. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item