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Story file
Release 5
For all systems. To play, you'll need a Z-Machine Interpreter - visit Brass Lantern for download links.
Story file (original)
Release 4
For all systems. To play, you'll need a Z-Machine Interpreter - visit Brass Lantern for download links.

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Cold Iron

by Andrew Plotkin (as Lyman Clive Charles) profile

2011

Web Site

(based on 31 ratings)
5 member reviews

About the Story

Your good axe has gone missing. Reverd Pearson would say you're a careless lunkhead who'd lose his ear if it wasn't nailed on. You figure he's right, a man of the cloth, but that doesn't mean piskeys didn't steal the thing...

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: October 1, 2011
Current Version: 5
Development System: Inform 7
IFID: 44CB5FD6-2293-4473-9784-6EC1CED280D2
TUID: x8ohk12d1a6f12ge

Awards

15th Place - 17th Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (2011)

Winner, Best Individual Puzzle - 2011 XYZZY Awards

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Member Reviews

5 star:
(2)
4 star:
(1)
3 star:
(18)
2 star:
(9)
1 star:
(1)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 5
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Most Helpful Member Reviews


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Well-written, bite-sized head-scratcher, February 27, 2012
by JasonMel (Florida)
The hook for this game was the writing style. That was clear right away. I was immediately delighted, not just by the authenticity, but by the class with which the culture was portrayed. Another reviewer called the protagonist a caricature, but if there is a meaningful distinction to be made between a caricature and an archetype, I'd call him the latter. The text is not full of derisive contractions and phonetic spellings, but instead is made from playful constructions of a kind that I haven't often found in IF, and were therefore a joy to read. In fact, I haven't had this much fun acting out the narrative voice in my head since Varicella. (It may have helped that I happened to be eating applesauce at the time.)

All this only made the experience more disappointing, since the game as a whole is over before you know it, and the initial character even sooner.

Unfortunately, the game manages to squeeze some problems in before the end. One thing in particular confused me before the halfway point: Belief in the supernatural is fine, if it comes from a tradition of some kind. But if I watch a movie, say, and then develop a belief that those specific characters are waiting somewhere to interact with me -- to me that's not superstition, that's madness. Again, meaningful distinction? I think it is, and it's one that muddies the game's message, such as it is.

The other main objections I had were to what I saw as questionable design choices, which, to be fair, an experimental work like this risks freely. First, I noticed that the game seemed to be taking a page from Photopia's Red chapter when constructing the map. In other words, you'll find new locations in a predetermined sequence, no matter which path you take. OK, fair enough. But if the game is going to do this (and we're on, you know, terra firma and not Dimension X), the game should learn from its own protagonist and leave stuff where you put it. I don't want to loop through the same sequence of rooms in random directions. I did not notice myself feeling lost, but I did notice myself feeling annoyed.

Finally, the transition. Bing! You'll know it when you see it. Since I had already read the instructions for this section in the last section, all I had to do was follow them, without knowing why they were necessary in the new context. For this reason, and since this new guy wasn't half as interesting as the old one, I rushed through and missed most of the impact of the latter half (which, again, is over almost before it begins).

Cold Iron certainly does one thing well, though -- it employs the Zarfian mystique that I'm apparently such a sucker for. The fact that it can do so in such a small space is interesting in itself. This experiment will make you think, even if it ultimately leaves you scratching your head.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Simple puzzles, satisfying twist, December 15, 2015
by verityvirtue (Singapore)
You've lost your axe. Despite everything the Reverend might say about you being a lunkhead, you know where it is: the dark forests behind your cottage.

Cold Iron has a relatively limited scope for one of Plotkin's games, both in size and implementation. Even with my limited puzzle-solving skills, Cold Iron took me about 5 minutes to finish. The puzzles, however simple, are pleasingly quirky: the things you find are linked to stories in your book of tales. The items needed to solve the puzzles are highlighted by the writing effectively, so it should not take too much effort to figure out what's going on.

There is also a pleasing, if ambiguous, twist, which made the small puzzles that much more satisfying, even adding a bit of emotional depth to the otherwise straightforward story.

Plotkin's contribution to the Hat Meta-Puzzle. A charming walk in the woods, February 3, 2016
Together with Last Day of Summer, Playing Games, and The Life (and Deaths) of Doctor M, this game was part of a meta-puzzle in IFComp 2011. The idea was that four games would have connections, and by pursuing clues in one, you could open more in the other games.

Cold Iron is Plotkin's contribution, and he has said that he rushed to get the smallest Plotkin game possible. It's charming; you are a bumpkin searching for an axe. By recalling stories, you progress through the game.

I felt like this game contained more of the hat puzzle than the other 3 games. Also, I didn't really understand what happened in the plot.

Playing all 4 games together is great. Doctor M is more independent and large, a real good game by itself. The other 3 are great en ensemble.

See All 5 Member Reviews

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Xyzzy "Best Individual Puzzle" winners by Nusco
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This is version 5 of this page, edited by Doug Orleans on 18 May 2015 at 12:19am. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item