Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Download


CoS.zip
Contains CoSv3.blb
For all systems. To play, you'll need a glulx interpreter - visit Brass Lantern for download links. (Compressed with ZIP. Free Unzip tools are available for most systems at www.info-zip.org.)
Walkthrough
This Walkthrough shows how to reach a good ending

Have you played this game?

You can rate this game, record that you've played it, or put it on your wish list after you log in.

Playlists and Wishlists

RSS Feeds

New member reviews
Updates to downloadable files
All updates to this page

City of Secrets

by Emily Short profile

Espionage/Fantasy
2003

(based on 89 ratings)
13 member reviews

Game Details

Language: English (en)
Current Version: 3
License: Freeware
Development System: Inform 6
Forgiveness Rating: Polite
Baf's Guide ID: 2106
IFIDs:  GLULX-3-030624-3FA2B47
GLULX-3-030624-03FA2B47
TUID: u6wzkckne4zsafyl

Awards

Nominee, Best Game; Nominee, Best Writing; Nominee, Best Story; Nominee, Best Setting; Winner, Best NPCs; Nominee, Best Individual NPC; Nominee, Best Use of Medium - 2003 XYZZY Awards

22nd Place - Interactive Fiction Top 50 of All Time (2011 edition)

23rd Place - Interactive Fiction Top 50 of All Time (2015 edition)

Editorial Reviews

Baf's Guide


Possibly Short's most polished work, and that's saying something. In a city based on both high technology and magic, trains and robots and illusions, an innocent traveller gets swept into the center of a clandestine power-struggle which will forever change the city and how it is seen. Excellent world-building, not just in that the environment is highly explorable and implemented in great detail, but in that the city has a distinct foreign-metropolis-through-tourist-eyes flavor, and a history which makes itself known in various and subtle ways. Good sense of choice: although there's basically only one ending, much of what happens along the way is variable. Uses the conversation system from Pytho's Mask: a combination of menus and ask/tell that's sensitive to context and lets you change topics arbitrarily. Even though most characters will respond to a wide variety of topics, it's still easy to run out of things to say. Features a "novice" mode, but the standard mode is recommended for anyone but the absolute newcomer to IF.

-- Carl Muckenhoupt

Gaming Enthusiast
We’re just a tourist without a clue what’s going on, so large part of the game is just exploration and marvelling at all the wonders around us. [...] Story-wise and by the creation of the setting, it is one of the best IF out there.
-- Toddziak
See the full review

IF-Review
Life In The Big City
I think my favorite thing about City Of Secrets is that it gave me several pieces of writing to treasure, things that I wanted to enshrine and remember. A quote from the denouement now appears in my collection of randomly rotating email signatures. Queen Rine's Meditation Upon Passion now hangs on my office wall. More than any other IF game I can think of, City Of Secrets offered me ideas that feel like they apply directly to my life -- that's the mark not just of a great game, but of a great work of art.
-- Paul O'Brian
See the full review

SPAG
There is an impressive amount of detail in the descriptions with nearly all first level objects implemented and many second and third level as well. Such extras as your complementary personal shampoo from the hotel are fully implemented, which gives the world a solid feeling. The City seems to be an actual place rather than merely the setting for a game. The superb map design also contributes to this feeling. The city is represented as 20 or so rooms, but between the graphical map that you have available and the intuitive layout of the main thoroughfares travel is easy. She has also admirably succeeded in giving the different sectors of the City a unique feel.
-- Cirk Bejnar

Overall it's an excellent game. It's not a puzzle-fest; it's not supposed to be. It's a conversation-fest. You can chat to (and "up" to some extent) a large number of NPCs who are all intelligently programmed. The way that the story unfolds is very well done, with different NPCs (and some books) filling in different parts of the canvas with their own style. To be honest it's not my cup of tea -- I prefer puzzles (like Metamorphoses), but I have no problems recommending this game to anyone.
-- David Jones
See the full review

Tags

- View the most common tags (What's a tag?)
(Log in to add your own tags)

Member Reviews

5 star:
(43)
4 star:
(38)
3 star:
(6)
2 star:
(2)
1 star:
(0)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 13
Write a review


Most Helpful Member Reviews


15 of 17 people found the following review helpful:
Impressive as a setting, but in need of more plot to accompany its backstory, September 2, 2008
by Jimmy Maher (Oslo, Norway)
Emily Short's longest and perhaps most ambitious game, City of Secrets wowed me completely for the first hour or two I spent with it. The plot has you, a rather naive tourist, arriving in a large city for the first time. Your sightseeing there is quickly complicated by a mess of conspiracies and counter-conspiracies that you discover. You must sort out what is really going on, figure out who are the real good and bad guys, and finally choose a side to support. While doing all this, you also get the opportunity to explore the City and learn something about its culture and history.

Indeed, it's the City that is the real main character of the game. It's part of a fantasy world of Ms. Short's creation in which magic and high technology co-exist, and are (predictably enough) frequently at odds with one another. The most obviously unique feature of the City is that there is no such thing as night -- it's daylight all the time, apparently due to some sort of human tampering. (This memorable little wrinkle of course has the added benefit for Ms. Short of saving her from having to code a realistic day-night cycle.) Short doesn't just depend on this one gimmick to define her setting, though. Her city and her whole world are worked out in impressive, subtle detail that includes not only the present but the last several thousand years of history as well. It's some of the best, most complete world-building I've ever seen in IF, and the greatest strength by far of the game.

Plot-wise, things start off almost equally strong. The early stages of the game perfectly capture the "stranger in a strange land" feel of a tourist in an unfamiliar city. When inexplicable things start to happen at the margins of your existence, the effect is suitably creepy, and then when you are taken before the head of one of the City's factions and enlisted rather forcefully into his cause, things get downright compelling. The writing is excellent, Ms. Short by this stage of her career having shed the slightly cloying preciousness that dogged her earliest work.

During the middle game, though, the plot machinery begins to break down. There's far too much wandering over a rather expansive map, far too much talking to a huge cast of characters about essentially the same topics again and again, and not really that much to actually DO. In fact, when Ms. Short wrote recently on her blog about the challenges of maintaining dramatic pace in games with lots of conversation, I thought immediately of this game as an example of said challenges. One problem is that the sheer number of NPC's here preclude anyone from really taking center-stage. There are lots of personalities, tons of conversations, but only the most superficial of relationships to be formed. This makes it hard to really care about the plot once the novelty wears off, and eventually even the hugely rich and imaginative scenery and back-story start to become mind-numbing without a compelling foreground story to enjoy there. I found myself on several occasions reduced to wandering around from place to place trying to shake something loose and drive the plot forward -- not exactly a compelling narrative experience.

I get the impression that Ms. Short may have simply bit off more than she could chew with this one. I sense a bit of authorial exhaustion in the latter stages. Regardless, its failures shouldn't detract too much from its strengths -- it's a near masterpiece of world-building. Every IF tourist should spend a bit of time wandering around inside it.

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful:
a sense of place and time, May 19, 2010
As other reviewers have said, the strength of CoS is the atmosphere of its setting. Though the author may have conceived the City as part of her own fantasy world; for me she manages wonderfully to capture the unmistakeable ambience of a middle-european capital during the later cold-war era. There is a polished, and almost luxurious veneer, but underneath, everything is curiously shabby and archaic. As the title implies, this is a city whose social structures are founded on lies and secrets rather than anything more substantial and enduring. Even the NPC interactions reflect the careful tones and phrasings of people living with the knowledge that everything they do and say may be observed.

The sense of place and time is so good, it seems almost churlish to draw attention to the slight flaws in the plot; a certain stiltedness that grows more marked the further we get into the story. To say that there were points at which I found myself becoming almost bored, gives a slightly inaccurate and rather picky picture. There was never any real danger I would give up, largely because the sheer depth and accuracy of the setting had me well and truly hooked.

Overall CoS was a very good game and a very enjoyable experience. I just couldn't help feeling that it had the potential to be even better.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Large, engrossing,... and somewhat lacking., December 6, 2019
by Rovarsson (Belgium)
Emily Short is one of my favourite IF-writers, and when I found this big story-game with her name under the title, I pounced on it!

And it is good. Apart from being an immersive adventure and a detailed exploration of a fine city, deeper themes also shine through.

Truth above obscurity, even if truth also means complete transparency?

Creativity above strict order, even if creativity also means chaos?

The writing is top-notch, the NPC interactions feel real, the city and it's history hold the interest, but in the end, the game misses something.

Is it because the game is so good that I raised the bar impossibly high?

Finding an outdoor café where there were no interactive NPCs and where nothing story-moving happened disappointed me.
Finding out that a little nook in the gameworld, about which I dreamed up many possibilities, didn't play a role in the story didn't feel like a red herring, it felt like a let-down.
Finding out that certain information I found about my character didn't matter to the game was a pity.

But those are nitpicks, and very personal nitpicks at that.

This game is very very good. Just not as amazing as I really really wanted it to be. And that's on me.

So play it.

See All 13 Member Reviews

If you enjoyed City of Secrets...

Related Games

People who like City of Secrets also gave high ratings to these games:

Enlightenment, by Taro Ogawa
Average member rating: (39 ratings)
"The intrepid Adventurer has escaped the caverns. Nought remains to block a successful escape but this troll here. Hmmm. A one-room adventure. The author recommends this for people who grew up on Zork II and Advent, and begs people...

Railways of Love, by Provodnik Games
Average member rating: (3 ratings)
They have feelings for each other. They are doomed to part. Train wheels click-clack monotonously. The ring of existence remains intact. Only you can break it giving the protagonists a chance for happiness. Play the fate's part in...

El Museo de las Consciencias, by Mel Hython and Santiago Eximeno and Grendel Khan and Urbatain and Depresiv
Average member rating: (2 ratings)
Tu padre te abandonó cuando aún no tenías uso de razón. Te dejó en una casa en la cima de una pequeña colina, al cuidado de dos mujeres siniestras, eternamente vestidas de negro...

Suggest a game

Recommended Lists

City of Secrets appears in the following Recommended Lists:

Some Games by Razzal

Best fantasy games by MathBrush
These are my favorite games that include some sort of magical or fantastical element. Games with mostly horror or sci-fi elements are on other lists, as are surreal games, fairy tale/nursery games, and religious/mythological games. I've...

A timeline of some important games for authors by MathBrush
This is a timeline of some highly influential games that used innovative techniques or left a mark on future games. I have not included 2015 games yet because it's hard to know what mark they will leave on the future. It leaves out games...

See all lists mentioning this game

Polls

The following polls include votes for City of Secrets:

Games about travel by penguincascadia
This list is for games either about travel or with travel as a major part of the plot or background. Stuff like being able to choose where you go from a relatively wide range of destinations, road trips, exploring a city or region as a...

Games where you can't screw up by Pinstripe
Sometimes, when I'm playing a game, I spend more time juggling my save files than I do reading the text. I don't want to have to restart because I picked up the green rod instead of the clay jug (with apologies to Zarf). So I'm looking...

IF created as a media tie-in by Felix Pleșoianu
Hello, everyone. I'm looking for IF pieces originally created as media tie-ins (i.e. as promotion/extras for a bigger project). The plan is to write an advocacy piece, but only two examples spring to mind: Emily Short's City of Secrets,...

See all polls with votes for this game

Links




This is version 10 of this page, edited by Denk on 20 November 2019 at 6:54pm. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item