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Run for the Oregon Legislature!

by Eva Schweber

Educational
2011

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Number of Reviews: 2
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful:
Interesting but Unfinished, July 16, 2011
by AmberShards (The Gothic South)
I have to admit that I was hesitant to play this game, and even more hesitant once I had cruised over to the web site. I was expecting a full-bored feminist assault. What I discovered was a rather retiring, unfinished endeavor.

RFTOL (amusingly similar to ROTFL) proceeds in a CYOA type fashion, with the curious use of the letter "n" to advance. You can choose one of four candidates, then a political party, and that's where RFTOL begins to break down. If you don't choose one of the major parties, then the game continues just as if you had. I'm not sure how later options, such as choosing a campaign manager, impact the final result. The tone of the game is straight ahead, although a little reserved. If you're expecting a slice of life in the wheeling, dealing, dirty tricks, high-pressure game of politics, this is not your game.

I ended the game with a score of 0 out of a possible 0 (always a sure sign of incompleteness), trapped in the darkness, and carrying a professional campaign manager.

Run for the Oregon Legislature! is interesting, but unfinished.

Comments on this review

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penguincascadia, February 26, 2016 - Reply
"was expecting a full-bored feminist assault."

Err, the LWV is a nonpartisan organization that is well respected. Heck, the very conservative Rick Perry gave he power to write voter pamphlets to them in Texas, so they're not certainly "evil liberals."
Victor Gijsbers, July 18, 2011 - Reply
I ended the game with a score of 0 out of a possible 0 (always a sure sign of incompleteness), trapped in the darkness, and carrying a professional campaign manager.

Well, at least this game made me laugh once. :)
David Welbourn, July 16, 2011 - Reply
The "n"-to-advance thing struck me as odd as well, until I guessed that the CYOA nodes were just rooms. So "n" just means "north" as usual, and you can type "s" (or "south") to backtrack.
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