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Rameses

by Stephen Bond profile

Slice of life
2000

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Reviews and Ratings

5 star:
(31)
4 star:
(47)
3 star:
(22)
2 star:
(7)
1 star:
(4)
Average Rating:
Number of Ratings: 111
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- GDL (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), July 2, 2009

- Vambuli, May 21, 2009

- Hipster Scumbag, May 4, 2009

- Otto (France), April 16, 2009

- Mark Jones (Los Angeles, California), March 31, 2009

- Jeremy Freese (Evanston, IL), February 21, 2009

- albtraum, February 8, 2009

- Cheryl L (Australia), January 9, 2009

- Robb Sherwin (Colorado), December 30, 2008

- Adam Biltcliffe (Cambridge, UK), December 28, 2008

- Linnau (Tel-Aviv, Israel), October 31, 2008

- Nathan (Utah), October 25, 2008

- madducks (Indianapolis, Indiana), September 5, 2008

- burtcolk, September 3, 2008

- helga (Australia), August 29, 2008

- thisisboots, August 14, 2008

- Beekeeper, July 28, 2008

- Anders Hellerup Madsen (Copenhagen, Denmark), July 21, 2008

- Clare Parker (Portland, OR), May 21, 2008

- Ghalev (Northeastern PA, United States), May 2, 2008

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful:
A psychological study in constraint, April 28, 2008
by Jimmy Maher (Oslo, Norway)
Rameses is a day in the life of a disaffected, alienated teenager at an Irish boarding school. Appropriately enough given its protagonist, it's a study in constraint. As you pass through a series of increasingly squirm-inducing scenes, you the player will try again and again to break Rameses out of the rut his life has become, only to have the game -- or, rather, Rameses himself -- refuse your requests with a variety of lame excuses. The game thus manages the neat trick of using its facade of interactivity to make its point -- said point being Rameses's refusal to recognize the control he has over his own life. The game is as railroaded as they come, but the mechanics serve the theme of the game.

None of which means this is a pleasant play. There are no happy endings here. Rameses is unlikable even to us who have privledged access to his real thoughts, and exasperating in that way that only a clinically depressed person can be. And yet, even as we want to slap him repeatedly, we also can perhaps begin to understand what it must be like to live in the prison he has made for himself. His one saving grace is that, unlike the bullies and fawners who surround him, he at least feels shame at his repeated moral failings.

I never want to play another game like this. Its central gimmick -- and I don't mean that word perjoratively -- will work exactly once. Here, though, it works brilliantly, even movingly.

- brattish (Canada), April 3, 2008

- OK Chickadee, February 26, 2008

- RichCheng (London, UK), December 19, 2007

- Tyrog, December 13, 2007


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