Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Download



This game is playable online at http://jayisgames.​com/​cgdc7/?gameID=15
Story file
Version 2
For all systems. To play, you'll need a Z-Machine Interpreter with Blorb support - visit Brass Lantern for download links.
Story file
For all systems. To play, you'll need a Z-Machine Interpreter with Blorb support - visit Brass Lantern for download links.

Have you played this game?

You can rate this game, record that you've played it, or put it on your wish list after you log in.

Playlists and Wishlists

RSS Feeds

New member reviews
Updates to downloadable files
All updates to this page

Terminal

by C. Everett

Science fiction
2010

(based on 3 ratings)
2 member reviews

About the Story

As an A.I., you are trapped in the facility you are housed in. When everyone leaves, you are all alone. Fashion yourself an actual body!

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: February 2, 2010
Current Version: 2
License: Freeware
Development System: Inform 7
IFID: 0B195BED-3F13-4393-9FED-F4083E0F552D
TUID: cxjkm5tqo2ale5dv

Awards

20th Place - Casual Gameplay Design Competition #7

Tags

- View the most common tags (What's a tag?)
(Log in to add your own tags)

Member Reviews

5 star:
(0)
4 star:
(0)
3 star:
(0)
2 star:
(2)
1 star:
(1)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 2
Write a review


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
Love it and hate it at once., May 14, 2010
by tggdan3 (Michigan)
I love this concept- you are an AI, your power failing, who has to make a body to inhabit. There are 2 paths- an organic body and a robot body.

Then there's the problems.

First, guess the verb (and noun) is huge here. There is a drone, and it's clear you need to use the drone to move around, however, "access drone" (or "access [anything]") gives no feedback, just another prompt. (Apparantly you need to "activate" it).

Then so many things are not named as they should be. The room describes "vats" that can only be referred to by their proper names (which you learn by accessing people's computers". The names of objects change as you examine them.

Building the android is tricky, too. "PUT x ON CHASSIS" does not work. You must "FIX x TO CHASSIS". Also, "android" isn't recognized. Some parts of the androids are "hidden", not described at all- the walkthrough implies you can find them, but even with it I was unable to find some objects.

The story is nice, and you can learn a lot about the characters by reading their journal entries, and it really had me feeling for the AI- but when the AI is named "Abe" and the game doesn't understand "ABE" or "AI", you have problems.

I feel I would really like this game, except for the poor implementation. In fact, the game isn't really hard at all, except for trying to figure out how to get the game to understand your commands.

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Bland and easy, but with some potential , February 16, 2010
Terminal is short, way too easy, and has very little artistic merit. The premise of the game shows potential, but the storyline is never fully developed. Basically, you play a computer-based entity who must build himself a body to escape his present situation.

The descriptions are short and contain grammatical errors. Descriptions of certain items could have been embellished a little more to give the game a better flow. Much of the scenery cannot be interacted with, nor examined. That leaves the player with the ability to examine only the objects necessary to completing the game.

There are two ways the player can win the game and both are very well-clued; too well clued, in my opinion. The puzzle becomes way too easy with all the hints that the player receives throughout the game.

However, despite all its drawbacks, there is some potential in Terminal. Perhaps the author's second game will fare better.

Terminal on IFDB

Polls

The following polls include votes for Terminal:

Split-up PC functionality by baf
In a normal game, there is a single fictional entity that is considered to be: - The protagonist: the character that the player is meant to identify with, and whose goals you are trying to achieve - The viewpoint character: the character...

No map necessary by Divide
Pieces which can be fully enjoyed without drawing map, ideally without taking any notes whatsoever. Ones which you could play on a bus, on a break, laying on bed, etc. with nothing but a portable player. Games for which you don't need...

Links




This is version 2 of this page, edited by David Welbourn on 11 April 2010 at 9:52am. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item