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My new walkthroughs for March 2019

Recommendations by David Welbourn (Kitchener, Ontario)

On Monday, March 26, 2019, I published new walkthroughs for the games listed below! Some of these were paid for by my wonderful patrons at Patreon. Please consider supporting me to make even more new walkthroughs for works of interactive fiction at patreon.com/dswxyz.

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1. A Flustered Duck, by Jim Aikin (2009)
Average member rating: (9 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

You play as Elliott, a pig-boy. It starts when Granny Grabby orders you to get Mabel the duck down from the roof. You try, but a series of unfortunate events ensue ending with Mabel swallowing the diamond ring you planned to give to Suzette! You need to get that ring back, but how?

2. A Good Breakfast, by Stuart Adair (1997)
Average member rating: (4 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this small game, you wake up late to the sound of the mail arriving. You remember last night's party; thankfully, you don't have a hangover. But you're positively starving! Get something to eat, and soon!

3. Got Toast?, by Jim Fisher (2000)
Average member rating: (3 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this fantasy game, you play as a broke guy who had a disappointing birthday. Instead of cash, all you got was an old toaster from your eccentric great great grandmother. You were hoping for money so you could make a homemade breakfast of eggs, bacon, toast, pancakes, and syrup for your girlfriend as you promised.

4. Rippled Flesh, by Ryan Stevens (1996)
Average member rating: (3 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this "interactive goosing", you play as a balding middle-aged man who wakes up in a desolate room, remembering only the number forty, a seductive women [sic], a tropical drink, and darkness. Exploring, you seem to be in a veritable hotel of horrors. Perhaps there's some meaning behind it all, but really, you just want to find the exit.

5. The Bryant Collection
by Gregory Weir
(2009)
Average member rating: (6 ratings)

David Welbourn says:

In 2008, the author bought a strongbox at a yard sale. The box contained handwritten descriptions of storyworlds by Laura Bryant, a woman who somehow invented interactive fiction without ever using a computer. Fascinated, the author has transcribed five of these stories to Inform so you can explore and enjoy them as well. The stories are called "The End of the World", "Morning in the Garden", "The Tower of Hanoi", "Going Home Again", and "Undelivered Love Letter".

6. Stupid Kittens, by Marc Valhara (2000)
Average member rating: (15 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this bizarre game, you play as Fuzzles, a stupid kitten. In life, you will be tormented and killed by your owner, a girl named Karen, for the amusement of the internet. In the afterlife, you will be tossed about by offended deities until you're reincarnated in Jennifer Love Hewitt's house with a mission. It won't end well. (Caution: This game contains poop jokes.)

7. Puddles on the Path, by Anssi Räisänen (2003)
Average member rating: (4 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this game where proverbs are magical spells, you play as an apprentice to Larumis the Sorcerer. After two years in his service, you're on the road home for a well-earned summer vacation when, through an iron gate in a stately stone wall, you see a mysterious garden. You forgot all about curiosity killing the cat.

8. Burnt Toast, by Josh Giesbrecht (2000)
Average member rating: (3 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this very tiny game, you wake to the smell of burnt toast. You better go down to your kitchen and find out what's wrong.

9. The Incredible Shrinking Woman, Too!, by David Dyte (2000)
Average member rating: (1 rating)
David Welbourn says:

In this small one-room game, you play as a woman whose hair spray made you shrink smaller and smaller! Thanks to the family parrot, you're now on the kitchen bench beside a now-huge toaster. Your only hope of rescue is the phone on the other side of an impassable sink full of dishes and green water.

10. Spitting Crumbs, by Duncan Cross (2000)
Average member rating: (2 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this short surreal game, you play as someone who has a piece of bread but would prefer to eat some toast. With some butter and jam on it, if you please. Expect many explosions.

11. There Is No Bread, by Mikko Vuorinen (2000)
David Welbourn says:

In this minimalist non-game and non-story, you are someone in a kitchen with a toaster. There is no bread — or anything else.

12. Toasterama, by Doug Jones (2000)
Average member rating: (1 rating)
David Welbourn says:

In this small game, you play as some guy who wakes up after dreaming about his ex-girlfriend again. Kelly took almost everything with her when she moved out. Shame she didn't also take that damned toaster waiting for you in the kitchen. And it's time for toast.

13. Tommy the Toaster, by Coala (2000)
Average member rating: (3 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this minimalistic one-room game set in a kitchen, you play as anyone. On the wooden table are Brad The Bread and Tommy The Toaster. Let's see what you do.

14. (You're) TOAST!, by Gunther Schmidl (2000)
Average member rating: (2 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this game, you play as someone who had the new Toast-O-Matic ThreeThousand installed while you weren't home, and you return to find a gigantic toaster and parts of your home transformed! This is ridiculous. How are you supposed to make toast now?

15. Eruption, by Richard Bos (2009)
Average member rating: (13 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this small straightforward escape game, you play an an island villager who wakes up in a small cave after a night of drinking. You soon discover that everyone's left the island because the volcano is about to erupt! Find a way off the island and soon!

16. Finding the Mouse, by James Dessart (2009)
Average member rating: (6 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this tiny one-room game, you play as someone in their mostly-empty kitchen who wants to use their computer. But where's the mouse? Where did that thing go?

17. Riverside, by Jeremy Crockett and Victor Janmey (2008)
Average member rating: (14 ratings)
David Welbourn says:

In this incomplete mystery, you play as a man named Mike who feels obligated to investigate the murder of his psychiatrist friend John. CAUTION: Contains read-authors'-minds issues and an abrupt troll ending.

18. Color of Milk Coffee, by Bahri Gordebak (2012)
Average member rating: (1 rating)
David Welbourn says:

In this extremely short story, you play as someone sitting on a balcony, drinking milk coffee, and waiting. You don't know what you're waiting for, but you're certain that if you wait long enough, something will change and you'll know it.


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