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Wishbringer

by Brian Moriarty

Fantasy/Zorkian
1985

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Reviews and Ratings

5 star:
(28)
4 star:
(35)
3 star:
(20)
2 star:
(3)
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Average Rating:
Number of Ratings: 86
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
A fairly easy but fun adventure where every puzzle has multiple solutions. , May 1, 2019
by deathbytroggles (Minneapolis, MN)
Touted as an adventure game for beginners by Infocom and Wishbringer certainly fits the bill. I played this text adventure when I was fourteen and required no hints for the duration. But this romp is still enjoyable for people of all ages and abilities.

You play a postman with a directive from your boss to deliver a package to an old lady who lives at the north edge of town, and by 5 o’clock or you’re fired! Delivering the package is easy enough, but what’s in the package, as you later discover, triggers a series of events that unveils the dark secrets of your town, spilling it in darkness and terror. Of course, the fate of the town rests in your hands, but you must first discover what the hell is going on.

The wishbringer itself is a magick (sic) stone that can cast several spells if one is carrying the proper items. While the spells can help the beginner get out of some sticky situations, solving the puzzles without the aid of the stone yields better results (and more points!). The experienced gamer will likely never need the stone, but it does provide replay value.

As per usual with Infocom adventures the writing is top-notch and plenty of humor finds it way into the normally creepy ambiance. While Wishbringer offers no surprises, it should be a pleasant and rewarding experience for most players.

- SchnickelFritz (TX), December 29, 2018

- e.peach, December 28, 2017

- stet, November 21, 2017

- Integer Man (Columbus, Ohio), October 7, 2017

- Laney Berry, August 22, 2017

- Guenni (At home), August 2, 2017

- jamesb (Lexington, Kentucky), July 12, 2017

- ulmo, April 25, 2017

- ifMUD_Olly (Montana, USA), April 21, 2017

- TheAncientOne, March 25, 2017

- Spike, February 26, 2017

- winterfury (Russia), December 11, 2016

- Xavid, December 7, 2016

- Denk, September 1, 2016

- NinaS, July 3, 2016

- Matt Bates, March 28, 2016

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Infocom game for beginnners with a light world/dark world concept, February 3, 2016
This Infocom game is directed towards younger players but is appropriate for adults; in fact, the game is still very challenging. The fantasy elements are charming and fun (and sometimes pretty creepy): an army of boots, a witch who steals cats, ghosts who murder you...

All the puzzles can be solved with sufficient exploration and minor logic; I missed a few areas and items in my exploring, though, because the world is rich and beautiful.

As far as I can tell, the game is for beginners because there are only the n,e,s,w directions (no ne, se, nw, or sw); most puzzles have multiple solutions; most items are easily visible (except for the most important one); and death won't come unless you have been repeatedly warned.

The game is split into two sections; one where the player explores a quaint village with minor annoyances (such as locked gates and a poodle); and a second section where the village has turned dark and evil (with murderous ghosts and a hellhound).

As many have stated, this is a memorable game, more so than most of the Infocom games I have played, or interactive fiction in general. As usual, I played this game on the Lost Treasures of Infocom app on the iPad.

- Robb Sherwin (Colorado), August 5, 2015

- Pegbiter (Malmö, Sweden), June 15, 2015

- Pope of Gainz, June 3, 2015

- chux, May 19, 2015

- Thrax, March 11, 2015

- punktbild, March 7, 2015

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Gentle and clever, January 14, 2015
by Form 27b-6 (Southern California)
Wishbringer is a whimsical fantasy adventure of intimate scale. Your goal seems mundane at first; to rescue the cat. That is until you comprehend the true meaning of your journey through a very touching ending sequence.

Like Trinity, Brian Moriarty's masterpiece, the game prefers a loose narrative structure over a strong linear plot. This freedom allows the player to focus on other tasks when facing a particularly hard problem. The story is more suggested than revealed, through subtle, sensible prose. I can't help but to feel the obvious love of the author for metaphors, in a very similar tone than his other game.

Puzzles are clever and logical, offering a reasonable, still rewarding challenge to IF newcomers. I love the fact that there is multiple ways of resolving a particular situation. There is the risk of rendering the game unsolvable, but it is short enough so that starting over won't be a hassle. Here is definitely a game that can be beat without hints.

Wishbringer is without a doubt a terrific introduction to IF. It is relatively short, forgiving but not trivial, and its simple but meaningful story is written with style and economy.



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