Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Download

Have you played this game?

You can rate this game, record that you've played it, or put it on your wish list after you log in.

Playlists and Wishlists

RSS Feeds

New member reviews
Updates to downloadable files
All updates to this page

I Hunger

by David Yates

Horror
2015

Web Site

(based on 1 rating)
1 member review

About the Story

For numberless aeons I have slumbered in my bed of rock and fire.

Now comes Man, and he is restless and disruptive. Like the ant, he scurries atop the surface above my dwelling place, moving and reshaping sacred rock many times his own size.

I care little for this Man. I would destroy him as I have destroyed others, as an unconscious reflex, but I suspect that he is tasty.

Originally written for Ludum Dare 33 using Twine 2.

Game Details

First Publication Date: August 23, 2015
Current Version: Unknown
License: Creative Commons
Development System: Twine
Forgiveness Rating: Polite
IFID: Unknown
TUID: qdzkvorvxsfk5r1a

Tags

- View the most common tags (What's a tag?)
(Log in to add your own tags)

Member Reviews

Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 1
Write a review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
A bitter late night snack, September 25, 2020
by AKheon (Finland)
Related reviews: horror, choice-based, twine
I Hunger is a choice-based horror game by David Yates, published in 2015. You play as a mysterious God-like being who observes humans from inside a volcano and regularly demands sacrifices... or else!

The gameplay consists of making a choice of what sacrifice you desire each cycle. There are four different types of sacrifices, and your choice (Spoiler - click to show)impacts how the nearby human society will develop. Your role is a bit like natural selection; the humans will adapt in response to your cruel demands. There are also multiple endings, and the way you reach them makes sense in the context of the gameplay. If you (Spoiler - click to show)only demand one single thing over and over again, it usually results in a bad ending. For instance, demanding gold over and over again causes resources to deplete and the remaining humans will simply choose to escape your wrath. Playing smart on the other hand allows humanity to prosper, which lets you prolong the cycle of sacrifices indefinitely.

The writing is in first-person and it has a detached and grandiose style, as you would expect from some ageless being that expects worship. The tone of the game is not scary, per se, but it is fairly dark. The main character is an amoral glutton without real redeeming qualities, but the humans at his whim are also cast in a somewhat bad light as they (Spoiler - click to show)will rob and enslave people from nearby regions to placate your needs without having to sacrifice their own kin. However, it's also true that moderate expansionism can lead to one of the happier ending paths with humanity flourishing in long term. It seems that regular moral judgments become harder when you're dealing with a massive time scale, like in this story.

The level of polish is generally good, but I did notice one typo and one missing message: (Spoiler - click to show)you get a blank screen after you observe humans if demanding knowledge is your first sacrifice.

I Hunger features a thought-provoking concept and a compact, mostly functional execution. It's a very short game, but the multiple endings add a bit of replay value to it. It could be worth spending some 15 minutes with if you wish to step into the shoes of a mildly genocidal God.

Links




This is version 2 of this page, edited by David Yates on 4 March 2018 at 9:57am. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item