Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Download


Play online
Play this game in your Web browser.
Download as zip
Unzip and open index.​html
Play this game in your Web browser. (Compressed with ZIP. Free Unzip tools are available for most systems at www.info-zip.org.)

Have you played this game?

You can rate this game, record that you've played it, or put it on your wish list after you log in.

Playlists and Wishlists

RSS Feeds

New member reviews
Updates to downloadable files
All updates to this page

Pirateship

by Robin Johnson profile

2019

Web Site

(based on 12 ratings)
2 member reviews

About the Story

Who doesn't love pirates? Who, that is, apart from the British, the Spanish, the French, the Dutch, innkeepers, crocodiles, flying children, other pirates, merchant seamen with valuable cargoes of gold and rum, sharks, and SCURVY LANDLUBBERS?

A puzzly adventure with the feel of a classic parser game carried in a point-and-click interface.

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: October 1, 2019
Current Version: Unknown
License: Freeware
Development System: Custom
Forgiveness Rating: Merciful
IFID: Unknown
TUID: mmzl66wgjvupujvt

Awards

18th Place - 25th Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (2019)

Editorial Reviews

IFComprehensive

Pirate adventures are a comfortable genre in interactive fiction, providing a convenient source for adventures and a setting that’s exotic but relatable. “Pirateship” is an choice-based adventure game takes advantage of the motif by providing an exceptionally smooth user interface for its exploration and puzzle-solving. ...
See the full review

Tags

- View the most common tags (What's a tag?)
(Log in to add your own tags)

Member Reviews

5 star:
(2)
4 star:
(2)
3 star:
(7)
2 star:
(0)
1 star:
(1)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 2
Write a review


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Pirate-themed light puzzle comedy, December 11, 2019
Pirateship is a lighthearted, pirate-themed puzzle comedy with the feel of a classic parser game. It's not technically a parser game because it's built with Johnson's point-and-click Versificator development system, but its room-based geography and use-the-right-object-in-the-right-place puzzles very much fit the classic parser style.

Most, if not all, of the humor in Pirateship comes from playing with pirate tropes. Sometimes the comedic effect comes from subverting these tropes, and sometimes the tropes are carried to such extremes that you can't help laughing. For me, the game tended to walk a fine line between funny and silly, but occasionally it hit absolute comedy gold.

The puzzles range in difficulty from relatively straightforward to somewhat hard, which I think is the right range for this kind of game.

I found myself wishing for more emotional depth in Pirateship, though. I know the game is going for the feel of a classic parser comedy, and those kinds of games aren't generally noted for their extra emotional layers. But I can't help thinking that Pirateship could have done more here - and that that would have made it a better game. By way of contrast, Lost Pig is a great IF comedy not just because the prose is so often funny, but because (Spoiler - click to show)Grunk is oddly philosophical for a supposedly dumb orc, because the relationship between Grunk and the gnome is touching and a nice contrast of personalities, and because Grunk's blunderings actually serve as the catalyst for the gnome to make some changes to the lonely life he's been leading. The only layer in Pirateship beyond the laughs is its playing with pirate tropes (which, again, are the source of much of that comedy).

But I did enjoy Pirateship, and I think the game successfully does what it's trying to do. So, if you're looking for a light-hearted puzzle comedy with an old-school parser feel (but without the guess-the-verb frustrations of old-school parser games), or you just like pirates, you should give Pirateship a try.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
A rollicking pirate adventure game in Johnon's signature parser hybrid style, October 2, 2019
by MathBrush
Related reviews: about 1 hour
Robin Johnson is one of the best IF authors of the last few years, putting out games like Detectiveland and Zeppelin Adventure. These games, and Pirateship, use a parser-hybrid engine based off of Johnson's Versificator parser (used in games like the Xylophoniad).

This game doesn't reach the heights that Detectiveland did (which had 4 separate cases to work on), but it's a solid entry that will please fans of his previous games, and of puzzles in general.

You play as a pirate on an island that has a surprising number of inhabitants. There is a lot of conversation, and several complex mechanics (including a diving apparatus and a kind of pirate prosthetics lab). I used a walkthrough for a few of the trickier puzzles.

This game is polished, descriptive, has good interactivity, and I would definitely replay. It didn't draw me in emotionally, as I didn't really feel any kind of connection to the NPCs, or find an overarching story like Zeppelin Adventure. But this isn't a game looking to be deep; it's looking to entertain, and its succeeding. I debated on whether to give a 4 or a 5, but the primary purpose of my ratings on IFDB is to indicate the quality of a game compared to all other IF, and so I think a 5 is appropriate here. Compared to Johnson's other games alone, I would give this a 4.

If you enjoyed Pirateship...

Related Games

People who like Pirateship also gave high ratings to these games:

Capsule II - The 11th Sandman, by PaperBlurt
Average member rating: (13 ratings)
There's this pause on the Makida every time the current Sandman goes back into the cryotube, and before the new one awakes. A certain calm where all is still. The Makida's dull hum is heard, but that is all. No footsteps. No whispers. No...

Babel, by Ian Finley
Average member rating: (128 ratings)
In this game, you play as an amnesiac inside Babel, an abandoned Arctic facility devoted to biological research. You soon discover that you have the unusual ability to witness scenes from the past by touching various glowing items. But...

Niney, by Daniel Spitz
Average member rating: (7 ratings)
Explore the nature of relationships and identity on a weird train. Author's Comment: "We all ask ourselves, "Who am I?" One of the ways we try to answer this question is by examining the effects we have on other people. We look at our...

Suggest a game

Links




This is version 7 of this page, edited by Robin Johnson on 7 December 2019 at 4:58pm. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item