Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Lime Ergot

by Caleb Wilson (as Rust Blight) profile

2014

Return to the game's main page

Member Reviews

5 star:
(13)
4 star:
(28)
3 star:
(15)
2 star:
(3)
1 star:
(0)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 7
Write a review


1-7 of 7


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Hallucinated reality, August 31, 2020
by Victor Gijsbers (The Netherlands)
Lime Ergot is a short game, but makes the most of its premise. You are one of only two surviving officers of a colonial military force; the other being the black-hearted and possibly insane general, who orders you to make her a drink. The game's central task is to find the ingredients for this drink. But rather than traversing a physical space through movement, we traverse a partially sensory and at least partially hallucinated space through use of the examine command. Examining things not only leads us from one object to others that were not initially described; rather, by making things present to our mind, it gives them reality and allows us to physically manipulate them. A fascinating mechanic that is combined with beautiful, evocative prose and a great atmosphere. A little gem.

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Drink: Green Skull. Next ingredient: 1 reviewer, whole., June 23, 2019
The colony is in ruins, the fleet is gone, and only you and your general are left. She wants a cocktail, and it's up to you to find the ingredients to make it. The problem is, you can't actually move. Or can you?

Lime Ergot has a fascinating approach to the idea of movement in parser fiction, in that you don't move at all but rather look, and look deeper, and look deeper still. Descriptions are layered on top of one another, drawing you ever forward into the bizarre and decaying world that you are trapped in.

Even though this is a fairly short game, the world-building and atmosphere within is extraordinary, and reminded me a little of the New Weird authors like China Miéville or Jeff VanderMeer. I have managed to find only two endings, and I do hope there are more - though try as I might I have been unable to confirm that. Perhaps there's another layer deeper still that I have been unable to get to, which just shows how complex it is.

Overall I enjoyed Lime Ergot, and it inspired me to check out other games that have similar non-traditional methods of exploration. Four St. Stellio limes.

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Excellent SpeedIF that plays with parser conventions, June 15, 2018
by Harry Coburn (Atlanta, GA)
SpeedIF is an interesting beast. Most have an interesting idea at their core but poor execution due to the time constraints. But then a lime-green gem like this comes along that feels coherent and complete. I rather enjoyed this game. Found two endings.

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
Great hallucinatory speed IF. Examine things that you then examine, etc., February 3, 2016
by MathBrush
Related reviews: less than 15 minutes
I've heard many people talk about Lime Ergot, but I had no idea what it was about. It was an EctoComp 2014 game, so it had to be written in 3 hours, although it has since been updated.

The main thrust of the game is that you are standing with a general near a city, trying to make a Green Skull drink. Everything is vague and surreal. You 'move' by examining things, then examining more and examining more.

I had trouble getting started, but once I got started, it got easier and easier.

Strongly recommended for its fun-to-time ratio.

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Ingenious mechanic, unsettling atmosphere, May 8, 2015
by verityvirtue (London)
You and the general are the last ones left on the island of St Stellio, and she wants adrink. You’re the lower-ranking officer, so it’s up to you to get the drink done.

The game consists of find-the-object puzzles through descriptions which act like nested dolls (‘telescopic’ descriptions?). Examining one object reveals another, which reveals another, which reveals another… While the puzzle itself wasn't much, the joy of playing Lime Ergot was in the devices and scenery. The mechanic was ingenious, keeping the game’s scope small without feeling contrived. The writing is lush and evocative, and suited the mildly hallucinatory state of the PC. Lime Ergot is a well-thought-out, tidy piece for one written in three hours.

Similar to Castle of the Red Prince.

Approx playing time: 30 mins

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
—in the ::::: lime ::::: light :::::, January 28, 2015
by J. J. Guest (London, England)
Related reviews: Ectocomp 2014
The most frightening of the Ectocomp 2014 games that I've played so far, Lime Ergot creates a genuinely unsettling atmosphere for all the beauty of its tropical setting. The game's main NPC, the General, doesn't do or say much but she nonetheless exerts a terrifying power.
Note: this rating is not included in the game's average.

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful:
An indolent fever dream, January 20, 2015
by CMG (NYC)
In this game you never move. You see and remember and hallucinate.

You are standing on a sunbaked wharf and your commanding officer, a wizened general in a wheelchair, orders you to prepare her a cocktail: a green skull. It requires limes. You have no limes. This is the game's premise, and acquiring the limes is its only puzzle.

Because you cannot leave the general's side, all that you may do is "examine" your surroundings, and as your examinations deepen, you peel back diaphanous layer after diaphanous layer until the atmosphere is swimming with lost memories. The scenario is hazy and beautiful, but also wrong, diseased.

Castle of the Red Prince uses this same mechanic, but whereas that game allows the player to move lightning-fast across the landscape by simply "examining" different objects or locations, Lime Ergot internalizes the action by rooting you to a single spot. The sensations that you uncover gather around you like a fog, and experiencing this mood is the game's purpose.

I discovered two endings. Both are easy to find, and both are worth reading. More might be possible.

The game is short, the writing crisp, with subtle eccentricity throughout. On the surface it is as light and refreshing as a breeze, but there is a creeping plague wind underneath. Try it if that sounds promising; move on if you prefer more varied gameplay or puzzle-solving.


1-7 of 7 | Return to game's main page