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The Island

by Old Andy

Horror
2012

(based on 16 ratings)
2 member reviews

About the Story

Mysterious story...

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: September 30, 2012
Current Version: 1
Development System: TADS 3
IFID: 7E647A16-16A0-EC01-50E7-488F6897EC54
TUID: 9yv2fzucjovhlha0

Awards

25th Place - 18th Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (2012)

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Member Reviews

5 star:
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4 star:
(0)
3 star:
(2)
2 star:
(8)
1 star:
(6)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 2
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Not bad old-style puzzling for its own sake., July 18, 2016
by Wade Clarke (Sydney, Australia)
Related reviews: Inform, IFComp 2012, fantasy
(I originally published this review on 11 October 2012 as part of my blog of IFComp 2012. This was the 14th of 26 games I reviewed.)

With its blurb which consisted not of a blurb but of a few weird, terse pieces of advice–

"to switch on walkthrough you must type "ftang" then "walkthrough" "shazam" will fill your inventory with useful things... "ftang" toggles cheat mode"

– I initially thought that the goal of The Island might be to mock the player. The game opened without a title page and dropped me on a clifftop from which I seemingly couldn't move. It also kept insisting: "This is a miserable place."

A few moves later I managed to unstick myself, began to explore my surroundings and realised that I had gotten off on completely the wrong foot with this game, just because of that peculiar blurb. The Island is in fact a straight, compact and sincere adventure-adventure of easy to medium difficulty, filled with the paraphernalia of fantasy adventuredom eternal. You find yourself on a creepy island; why are you there? It seems likely that you will find out if you do what adventurers do best: go around overcoming obstacles by solving puzzles. To seek more or less reason than this is misguided in the context of this game. The practical minded prose (though dotted with random atmospheric additions) and design make the game's mode apparent, so if you demand long descriptions of everything you see or elaborate in-world reasoning, this game isn't for you. The Island is like a kinder Scott Adams adventure, though a very typo-laden one, presenting the fun of this genre without the arduousness that is sometimes attendant upon it. UNDO is blocked – unnecessarily in this game, I feel – but I confess I didn't notice because I had been saving occasionally, which is all that is required.

The Island is more interesting to talk about if I leap immediately to its ending, so ahead is absolute spoilerage: (Spoiler - click to show)The game has a great conclusion. After you've solved all of the island's puzzles, your mode of escape from it turns out to be a ferry summoned by ringing a bell. It's also a ferry piloted by a guy who is clearly Charon / Death, who has perhaps grown weary of shunting English tossers around over in the world of Eurydice. Death takes you out to sea, only to deliver you back to the island, where he shuffles you into his set of adventure props as a pawn. The man you murdered earlier with the dagger (he was tied to a post, screaming madly, and there was nothing else you could do for him AND the game assured you that stabbing him brought him peace) becomes the new corpse in the coffin which contained the bell for summoning the ferry, and you in turn are tied to the post to become the new man who will be murdered with the dagger by the next person damned to this place. The cyclic inevitability of such a fate was signposted by the clues scratched onto the altar in the temple, which is why it pays off well.

The murder of the man tied to the post is probably still the weakest moment in the game, since it seems a far more obvious thing to do would be to try to cut his bonds. Even a message explaining that it would be impossible to do so for some reason (super tough bonds?) would fortify it, but I couldn't find any bond props or messages implemented. This still didn't bother me as much as it will bother some folks, as I've sacrificed NPCs for way less.


The Island's puzzles will be very familiar in nature for old school pundits, but the performance is the thing, and apart from all the typos making the game look weaker than need be, the performance is good, emboldened by the ending. The design is clear, simple and satisfyingly. It's fun to be able to have an adventure like this without it being too taxing.

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
A short, surreal game with some straightforward puzzles , April 21, 2016
The Island is a relatively short surreal game with some straightforward puzzles (guess a riddle, search every item, push everything, follow instructions, etc.). It includes some old-school puzzles that are tricky to program (like a raising/lowering bucket puzzle similar to the one in Zork I).

I actually like surreal creepy games like this. The plot structure was strongy reminiscent of Recorded, from a later IFComp.

The ending implies that (Spoiler - click to show)everything is a loop, with you becoming the new screaming man and the screaming man becoming the new guy in the coffin.

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This is version 2 of this page, edited by Edward Lacey on 13 December 2012 at 3:24pm. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item