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Downtown Tokyo, Present Day

by John Kean

Kaiju/Screen/Satire
1998

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Reviews and Ratings

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Number of Ratings: 22
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Monster mayhem in downtown Tokyo! Short, with two perspectives, April 8, 2016
This game has an interesting opening; you are in a movie theatre, watching a giant monster movie. The game is in third person, with the main character's actions being narrated by the observer in the audience.

The actual action has a brief intro, followed by the actual puzzle. You move in 3d on a map with a ton of fake locations and some (labelled) real locations. This puzzle seemed really hard, but it turns out that there are 4 different solutions.

This is the only giant monster attack game I have played, and it was really fun in its sphere.

- Mr. Patient (Saint Paul, Minn.), March 5, 2016

- Sobol (Russia), June 9, 2015

- Thrax, March 12, 2015

- Floating Info, December 11, 2013

- DJ (Olalla, Washington), September 30, 2013

SPAG

The plot is minimal, and it's to the game's credit that the whole thing is rather casual about the story--plenty of room for even time-sensitive actions, and the story essentially stops in the middle so that you can wander around and have fun. This is the sort of thing I'd disapprove in most IF but which works just fine here, since B-movies don't exactly set a high realism standard and it's so much fun to play with the toys you're given. Indeed, this middle section (if you can call it that in such a tiny game) is the best thing about Downtown Tokyo; the beginning and end come off more as quotations, homages, than as parodies, and the parody is much more fun.
-- Duncan Stevens a.k.a. Second April

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>VERBOSE -- Paul O'Brian's Interactive Fiction Page

Tokyo does a great many things well, and is one of the better short-short games I've played. Again, it's a bit disappointing when a game this enjoyable ends so soon -- I think this concept had quite a bit more mileage in it than was used by the author. Still, I enjoyed it while it lasted -- it won't entertain you as long as the average summer blockbuster movie, but it will probably entertain you more.

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- Edward Lacey (Oxford, England), January 6, 2013

- Joey Jones (UK), December 22, 2012

- Catalina, August 19, 2012

- stadtgorilla (Munich, Germany), April 17, 2012

- Walter Sandsquish, February 2, 2011

- Juhana, August 22, 2009

- Emily Boegheim, January 12, 2009

- Audiart (Davis, CA), January 2, 2009

- Ghalev (Colorado), December 13, 2008

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful:
The Chicken Must Die, July 2, 2008
by C.E.J. Pacian (England)
Although Downtown Tokyo, Present Day is most likely to be mentioned for its bipartite player character - you play the parts of both the hero in a monster B-movie and a cinema-goer in the audience - this game must surely be equally notable for demonstrating how a small set of commands can create a game that is diverse, malleable and above all fun.

All you need to do is fly your helicopter in compass directions, go up and down, and push the button that deploys its grabber - and in this fashion you explore the game's city, picking things up and dropping them experimentally, triggering various humorous responses from the parser, and doing all you can to save a nondescript love-interest from the clutches of a giant mutant chicken. There should be more IF games like this.

- Wendymoon, June 11, 2008

- J. Robinson Wheeler (Austin, TX), February 22, 2008

- JudgeDeadd (Warsaw, Poland), December 28, 2007

Baf's Guide


B-movie big monster spoof: defend Tokyo, and rescue lovely reporter, from the ravages of a colossal chicken. Very small, but with opportunity for irrelevant actions (like dropping live alligators onto ships from a helicopter). Satisfyingly satirical, with an interesting double perspective (the player controls both the hero of the movie and a member of the audience). Title sequence contains character graphics. Has a hint menu.

-- Carl Muckenhoupt

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