Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Ratings and Reviews by Ruber Eaglenest

View this member's profile

Show reviews only | ratings only
View this member's reviews by tag: IF Comp 2016 Spanish game
1-10 of 27 | Next | Show All


The Writer Will Do Something, by Matthew Burns, Tom Bissell

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Seminal modern narrative game, July 10, 2019
The writer will do something is a seminal twine made by insiders of the game industry, writers Tom Bissell and Matthew S. Burns. Born, maybe from a joke, or as a testimonial of "how games are done", it has been very influential in the narrative/game writers scene.

It has some of the best words put down on a Twine (IMHO). And it provides a sneak peek in how our modern triple-A games are done. How the chaos is modeled, and how they are built from spare parts that rarely fit properly as a narrative (you know, narrative dissonance and such).

It's cleverly written with delicious words, and flavor and tricks that delight and surprise the reader. It is very funny, terrifing, at the same time. I wholeheartly recommend it.

Being Beyoncé’s assistant for the day, by Green Chyna

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Cruel but joyful gauntlet on twitter gamebook, June 27, 2019
So, this is a gamebook done on twitter. We've seen several attempts of doing that with the limitations of the platform, but this one uses the natural way twitter manages threads and sub-threads. Hint: it works.

Better, it is not "another gamebook where the audience decides through polls", all the threads are there, implemented, for your enjoying.

The game is a very cruel gauntlet (a quite linear structure where each deviation just kills you) but very very funny.

This is a demonstration of how fallen into disuse gamebook structures are interesting. You know, the trends say that time caves and gauntles are not worth and such, but, how many time caves we are missing?

Also, killing the player a lot in gauntlets is considered bad design, but again, this game demonstrates when that is false: when it's a lot of fun! For this to work, you must do that the multiple endigns and killings are amusings, and so it is in this game.

About the cruelness rating, this games rates Cruel in the Zarfian scale because it has death threades within the sub-threads. That is, you can choose a sub-thread without knowing all options there are just deaths. Fantastic!

The Ballroom, by Liza Daly
Click!, May 23, 2019
This is the piece of IF by Liza Daly that made click! for me to understand the very nature of what her own engine, Windrift, does. Mutable stories where their output can be read like a proper paper document.

In the past, I found the works of Liza to be lacking more traditional choice based interaction and the agency of me as a reader. Thanks to The Ballroom finally I could fully understand that we are in a new paradigm here, those of "mutable stories".

This third instance for the engine shows a lot of capabilities in proving that you can have a deep agency a lot of choices to modify the story radically within the engine. So, in a sense, it is a showing of the capabilities of Windrift to provide further interaction... but what a show! The ballroom is crispy and funny and somewhat meta (something I like very much), where each interaction could radically change the universe of the story, changing from the time and place of the story, to the very nature of the characters.

It gets tangled easily, in the last phases of the game, I felt that the "winning move" was within my reach, but the multiples variables, change of times and possibilities just crowded in my head, and in the end, I was unable to achieve a proper ending. So, in a way, it is a puzzle game implemented using a very new paradigm like the stories that Windrift provides. Very impressing.

Maybe I will return to it with a walkthrough or something, but in the meanwhile, it was a hell of a time. Very recommeded.

El libro que se aburría, by Antonia Visiedo
Spanish classic fairy tale romp, April 23, 2019
by Ruber Eaglenest
Related reviews: Spanish game
This is a modern classic of the Spanish scene. Created by Antonia Visieda (aka Jenesis). It is a mashup of classic fairy tales tropes reimagined as a funny lighthearted puzzler for all ages.

It is, also, one of the few works in Spanish done for a juvenile audience in mind is ideal for kids above 7. The story is just for the fun of it, with nothing like serious topics or deep meanings, and that's just great.

It has some original use of the parser, the narrator and the break of the fourth wall, with the main character or avatar as a shape-shifting entity. Those features are not heavily used in the adventure, but, there they are.

The game comes in two formats, Z Machine, and AGE system. The AGE version is a remake with graphics and maybe, sound? I dunno, anyway AGE is an obscure Spanish system optimized for MUDs and roleplaying games that requires JAVA, and even with that, it is somewhat dificult to run the game, so I would go for the vanilla, only text, Z machine version.

La Pequeña Cerillera, by J. Francisco Martín

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Canonical modern interactive fiction for the XXI century, November 6, 2018
This work my JFM Lisaso is a canonical piece of what IF for the XXI century should be. Sadly for you, reader, it is in Spanish.

It is an interactive retelling of Andersen's The Little Match-Seller. Parsed based but with a framework powered by Vorple that make it looks and sounds amazing. Also, it has an advanced UI where you can play solely using hyperlinks or the classical parser, or a simplified one a-la Aaron Reed's Blue Lacuna. So it is a rare example of a hypertext story build using a world model (Inform 6 is under the wraps).

The story is the classical one, gripping and effective powered by interactivity and multimedia. A masterpiece.

left/right, by chandler groover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Funny little piece on a trope, July 7, 2018
Groover have fun with trope of blind choosing in a fork, demonstrating that even little interaction has value thank to surprising outcomes.

I would like that even the title would be an actual fork. To make re-runs more quick.

Castle of the Red Prince, by C.E.J. Pacian
Ruber Eaglenest's Rating:

Choice of the Deathless, by Max Gladstone
Ruber Eaglenest's Rating:

Slouching Towards Bedlam, by Star Foster and Daniel Ravipinto
Ruber Eaglenest's Rating:

Spider and Web, by Andrew Plotkin
Ruber Eaglenest's Rating:


1-10 of 27 | Next | Show All