Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Metatextual Conceits

Recommendations by Michael Martin (Mountain View, California)

Most works of IF present themselves as works of IF, to be interacted with by you, the user, much as a reader would read a novel. These games play with or reject this, by presenting themselves as some other kind of artifact, or by otherwise behaving as if they are from some alternate timeline.

Add a comment

1. The Gostak
by Carl Muckenhoupt
(2001)
Average member rating: (47 ratings)

Michael Martin says:

Clearly not of this Earth, but the evolution of IF libraries was uncannily similar.

2. Deadline Enchanter
by Alan DeNiro
(2007)
Average member rating: (50 ratings)

Michael Martin says:

The "you" the purported author addresses in the ABOUT text is decidedly not the player.

3. A New Day, by Jonathan Fry (1997)
Average member rating: (9 ratings)
Michael Martin says:

The game pretends to be incomplete - discovering the circumstances as to why drives the plot.

4. Cheater, by Wesley Osam (1996)
Average member rating: (8 ratings)
Michael Martin says:

Explaining in detail would spoil its only puzzle.

5. IF Quake, by Jason Bergman (2004)
Average member rating: (2 ratings)
Michael Martin says:

Very faithfully pretends to be reading information from an actual Quake install.

6. Treasures of a Slaver's Kingdom
by S. John Ross
(2007)
Average member rating: (31 ratings)

Michael Martin says:

Much like the tabletop RPG system it purports to be an adaptation of, it presents itself as a faithful reconstruction of a work from a nonexistent past.

7. Ugly Chapter
by Sam Kabo Ashwell
(2003)
Average member rating: (10 ratings)

Michael Martin says:

A Speed-IF written on the prompt "An Interactive Suicide Note" - the intended recipient is in-fiction, and, in fact, a fairly prominent NPC.


View this member's profile
See all lists by this member

Create your own Recommended List