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Eat Me

by Chandler Groover profile

Fantasy
2017

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Member Reviews

5 star:
(21)
4 star:
(16)
3 star:
(2)
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Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 5
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1-5 of 5


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Truly bizarre, but strangely beautiful, October 19, 2018
When I first started plaything this game I didn't really like it. It seemed confusing and I wasn't sure what my purpose was. The writing seemed thick and I had trouble getting going. There was also a shade of the grotesque to it all that I wasn't into at first. But as I stuck with it I eventually came to appreciate it more and more until I was hooked. Groover's writing is wonderful, even operatic at times. The puzzle components were kind of hard to pick out from the flowery prose, but the solutions made sense in the internal logic of the game and every time you completed a "course" the reward was great. I'll definitely play through it again sometime to see how my opinion of it has grown.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Visceral, lush, a grotesque escape game, July 17, 2018
by verityvirtue (London)
Related reviews: choleric
Chandler Groover’s work often mixes the decadent with the grotesque, the macabre with the picturesque. Think rotting roses; mouldering filigree.

Here, bound in a prison made of food, your only way out is by eating.

Who knew that eating could be so visceral? This is not just simple eating, it is consumption for consumption’s sake, for pleasure, for satiation. This is not going to be a game for everyone: the descriptions are so detailed as to be cloying, and there is heavy use of cutscenes to denote scene transitions.

This game is generous in allowing the player to backtrack and figure out what to do. As the name suggests, the range of actions available for the player are limited to eating, with the occasional exception clearly signalled - similar, then, to Arthur DiBianca’s games, such as Grandma Bethlinda’s Variety Box and Inside the Facility.

Eat Me resembles Groover’s Bring Me A Head, both in setting and in grotesquerie: both set in crumbling castles, each compartment holding just one singular occupant, doomed, it seems, to pursue their one occupation for the rest of time. Eat Me is not for the faint-hearted, definitely, but well worth playing, perhaps alongside other games with a similar setting.

For a lighter version of an eating-oriented game, try Jenni Polodna’s Dinner Bell; for more of the same, Bring Me a Head and Open That Vein by the same author.

A grotesque limited parser game about consumption, November 16, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: about 1 hour
I beta tested this game, and it was my personal choice for winner of IFComp 2017.

It is a grotesque game; you are a child granted a bottomless pit by a magical character in a fairy tale. You are imprisoned in a dungeon where countless other children have met gruesome deaths.

The game revolves completely around eating, with eating the only real action. Like DiBianca's Grandma Bethlinda's Variety Box, where USE was the only verb, the puzzles in this game revolves around timing and sequence.

I found this game satisfying, and have played it 6 or 7 times.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Gloriously Grotesque Parable on Gluttony, October 3, 2017
by Angharade
Related reviews: IF COMP 2017
This was so much fun.

I was utterly invested in the story. It was laugh out loud, over the top, and sometimes horrifying. I saw it all happen. I tasted it. I got hungry and had to take breaks to eat pasta, but then I was eating things in the game--that--I never--thought----

This was a visual masterpiece, a chef's horror and wet dream at the same time.

All results thought out, hints were helpful. I will say that I think the ending had a higher potential for depth than was carried out--but overall I felt almost fully satiated. My brain still craves eating a castle door made of devil's food cake, but alas, we can't always get what we want.

Brilliant piece, brilliant writing.

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Cool in a grotesque way, October 3, 2017
by Sobol (Russia)
A fruitful idea: taking one common action verb and building a whole game around it. We already had SMELL: The Game by the same author, KILL: The Game, GO NORTH: The Game together with GO WEST: The Game, last year's TAKE: The Game, and even USE - I mean, UNDERTAKE TO INTERACT WITH: The Game. Now it's EAT: The Game.

I often have hard time relating to the games by Chandler Groover with their aesthetics of abhorrent, but this one turned to be not as revolting as I initially expected. The puzzles were satisfying, the images vivid; the game is cruel (I think it should be the first one to boast both "child protagonist" and "evil protagonist" tags at IFDB at once), but not particularly repulsive to my taste - mainly because of two reasons:

1. A strong fairy-tale atmosphere that smoothes everything, gives an unreal, dream-like feeling (and excellently fits in with the game mechanics, as many classic children's tales are obsessed with food - Hansel and Gretel, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, etc.).

2. Many food descriptions were pleasant and genuinely appetizing (e.g. cheeses in the armory).

All in all, not a "don't play it while eating" kind of game.


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