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To Burn in Memory

by Orihaus

Historical
2015

Web Site

(based on 6 ratings)
2 member reviews

About the Story

To Burn in Memory, an ahistorical and atemporal Interactive Fiction work for IFComp 2015. Explore a city that never existed, and uncover its secret history through the memories of a woman that lived its darkest moments.

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: October 1, 2015
Current Version: v1.2
License: Freeware
Development System: Custom
Forgiveness Rating: Merciful
IFID: Unknown
TUID: xz13vr6w9kav36ld

Awards

33rd Place - 21st Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (2015)


News

v1.2 on Steam April 5, 2016
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Number of Reviews: 2
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Gorgeously designed, densely written, November 21, 2015
by CMG (NYC)
In this hypertext game you explore a ruined city that's stuck in time, or abandoned by time, or abandoned by the world at large -- it's all the same. The era this city exists in (or the era that it died in, anyway) shares similarities with early twentieth century Europe, and certain characters are mentioned as being French and German and so on, but its connection to real history is tenuous. Fantastical elements play a large role. There are clocks that don't tell time as we know it.

Gameplay involves poking around, finding keys, unlocking doors, opening safes, and gaining entrance to new areas. Sometimes you can activate memories that reveal how the city came to be in its current condition.

Despite the focus on memories and exploration, though, I never got a good sense about what was going on or what the city even really looked like. The text is written in an abstract, verbose style that often aims for higher marks than it can hit. And when it doesn't hit them, it produces confusion. You have to be an extremely skilled writer to pull off a style like this.

The game's opening references Umberto Eco, but I found myself comparing it more directly with Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, which is an Italian book from 1499 about a man wandering a dreamscape. Almost the entire book is dedicated to explaining the architecture of buildings in the dream, and the text will go on for pages lavishing elaborate philosophical descriptions on columns and fountains. I found it suffocating to read, and while To Burn in Memory is not nearly as overwrought, it does share Hypnerotomachia's interest in allegorical architecture. Both these texts also prefer complexity for its own sake, for its flavor.

Hypnerotomachia is a famously beautiful book, and To Burn in Memory also has a very lovely physical design. But they sit heavily in your gut and are hard to digest.

A visually and verbally dense/rich CYOA game about a lost city and melancholy, February 3, 2016
by MathBrush
Related reviews: IF Comp 2015
To Burn in Memory is an IFComp 2015 game. It has a visual style very different from other CYOA games such as Twine. It is all black with intricate white tracings underneath the text, and a series of icons on either side of the screen indicates what objects you pick up.

The writing style matches the visual richness. The opening line is a good example:‘Breathtaking isn't it?’ says Salandré, gesturing out over the vista, ‘Here is the city as I saw it — empty, painted in rust and gold, below tormented skies writhing in cruel fire.’ she continues, in a tone somewhere between opera and pantomime. ...

The gameplay consists of exploring an abandoned city, activating stored memories, and gathering keys to open different doors.

The game has a strong sense of melancholy. Because of its stylistic innovations, everyone should try out the first part of the game, until you've gathered a few items. Those who want to can then continue.

If you enjoyed To Burn in Memory...

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Recommended Lists

To Burn in Memory appears in the following Recommended Lists:

Doug's Top Ten of IF Comp 2015 by Doug Orleans
I played all 53 entries in IF Comp 2016. These were the top ten games on my ballot. Note that I rate games on slightly different criteria for the IF Comp than I do for IFDB; in particular, as per the Comp rules, I select my vote after...

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The following polls include votes for To Burn in Memory:

For Your Consideration - XYZZY-eligible multimedia uses of 2015 by Brendan Patrick Hennessy
This is for suggesting games released in 2015 which you think might be worth considering for Best Use of Multimedia in the XYZZY awards. This is not a zeroth-round nomination. The category will still be text-entry, and games not...

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This is version 7 of this page, edited by Doug Orleans on 5 April 2016 at 2:16pm. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item