Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Download


mrun.exe
MS-DOS Application
1req.txt
Readme
wok.opt
config file
wok.ttl
data file
wok.da5
data file
wok.da6
data file
wok.da4
data file
wok.da3
data file
wok.da2
data file
wok.d$$
data file
wok.da1
data file
wok.wlk
Walkthrough
wok.bat
batch file
wok.voc
data file

Have you played this game?

You can rate this game, record that you've played it, or put it on your wish list after you log in.

Playlists and Wishlists

RSS Feeds

New member reviews
Updates to downloadable files
All updates to this page

Sir Ramic Hobbs and the Oriental Walk

by Gil Williamson

Episode 2 of Sir Ramic Hobbs
Fantasy/Humor
1996

(based on 1 rating)
No member reviews yet - be the first

Game Details

Language: English (en)
Current Version: Release 1.1
License: Freeware
Development System: AGT
Baf's Guide ID: 238
IFID: Unknown
TUID: slgcnp059vk5u6gg

Awards

18th Place - 2nd Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (1996)

Editorial Reviews

Baf's Guide


Hobbs returns in a search for the deeds to Baron Doar's castle, stolen by the wizard formerly known as Quince. Has quite a lot in common with its predecessor - the wizard Prang, the dog Harvey, a familiar means of magical transport - but is smaller and more polished - the humor isn't as over-the-top and the magic is more detailed and flexible. Lightweight but fun. Contains a guided maze.

-- Carl Muckenhoupt

SPAG
You play a drunken knight the "morning after" who has to get the castle deeds back from an evil wizard - not the most original of plots. However, the amusing responses from the game's narrator and the situations you find yourself in more than make up for this.
-- John Wood

The ability to shapeshift into different animals was a lot of fun, and brought back fond memories of Infocom's "Arthur." It's funny, with clever object descriptions and commentary by the game's parser, which assumes the persona of a wizard who follows you about. [...] My score was dragged down, however, by a great deal of typical AGT fare: Incongruities, a lack of apparent plot until the very end, obscure puzzles, a maze where one wasn't necessary, odd results when the author didn't anticipate something [...]
-- Christopher E. Forman

Despite the fact that the game talks back to you, commenting on your every action, and making fun of many of the mistakes you're making, it is all very good natured (as opposed to a certain other competition game, that apparently made some people feel quite insulted). I never had the feeling that the author was making fun of me, but rather that we were sharing a joke. And Sir Ramic may be a buffoon, but he's quite a lovable buffoon.
-- Magnus Olsson
See the full review

Tags

- View the most common tags (What's a tag?)
(Log in to add your own tags)

Links




This is version 2 of this page, edited by Edward Lacey on 21 September 2013 at 6:28am. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item