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Photopia

by Adam Cadre profile

Slice of life
1998

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Reviews and Ratings

5 star:
(180)
4 star:
(103)
3 star:
(36)
2 star:
(12)
1 star:
(1)
Average Rating:
Number of Ratings: 332
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- HappyDooder (New Zealand), April 19, 2014

- Taffer, April 18, 2014

- Stefan Hornet (Bucharest), March 23, 2014

- Deychrome, March 20, 2014

- Lorxus, March 8, 2014

- Snave, March 7, 2014

- Jonas Kyratzes (The Lands of Dream), February 28, 2014

- 10CallClear, February 10, 2014

- Kendi, February 3, 2014

- Katrisa (Houston), January 28, 2014

- francisthe3rd (Horseheads, NY), January 23, 2014

- Simon Deimel (Germany), January 19, 2014

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Masterful, January 18, 2014
by scottmbruner (alameda, california)
Putting aside technical criticisms, Photopia clearly succeeds in its artistic ambitions - to create an immersive, emotional resonant experience by using IF elements to build intimacy with a touching, devastating tale. Revelatory.

- ajacks01, November 29, 2013

- bigotitos, November 8, 2013

- N.C. Hunter Hayden, October 29, 2013

- grainne6, October 25, 2013

- leavetheviolinalone (Singapore), October 14, 2013

Brass Lantern

[...] the overall layout of the story appears to be a complex weave, where you travel along the thread as it makes its way in one direction, turns around and comes back, crossing the previous parts of the weave and then continues. [...] In summary, this game is like an interactive story nestled inside another. A russian doll. A woven russian doll at that.

You wrote this review - Revise it | Add a comment

>VERBOSE -- Paul O'Brian's Interactive Fiction Page

The colors, like everything else in Photopia, worked beautifully, adding artfully to the overall impact of the story. The work is interactive in other important ways as well. In fact, in many aspects Photopia is a metanarrative about the medium of interactive fiction itself. Again, it wasn't until the end of the story that I understood why it had to be told as interactive fiction. And again, to explain the reason would be too much of a spoiler. I have so much more I want to talk about with Photopia, but I can't talk about it until you've played it. Go and play it, and then we'll talk. I promise, you'll understand why everyone has been so impatient. You'll understand why I loved it, and why I think it's one of the best pieces of interactive fiction ever to be submitted to the competition.

You wrote this review - Revise it | Add a comment

- Adam Myers, September 19, 2013

- Indigo9182, August 13, 2013

- Egas, August 12, 2013

- Enrique, July 31, 2013

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Short, simple, unique IF. Everyone should try it., July 31, 2013
by Cody Gaisser (Inglewood, East Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America, Earth, Solar System, Milky Way, Known Universe, ???)
The narrative content of Photopia is what I'd call a "good little story." It's not the most mindblowingly deep thing I've ever read; but it has some heart, humanity, and empathy to it. To me this in itself is more than adequate compensation for the very brief amount of time it takes to play through to the end.

The real reason to play, however, is the way this "good little story" is told. Unfortunately this is difficult to explain without spoilers - even formal aspects of the storytelling and interface present twists that are best experienced firsthand. Learning-what-Photopia-is-about is what Photpia is about.

(Spoiler - click to show)
The presentation of Photopia differs in a number of ways from traditional text adventures. It tells a very short, simple story. However you play not as a single character navigating a geographical space as the story unfolds before you in a chronologically-linear fashion; rather you experience chronologically-ambiguous fragments of the story from the perspectives of several different characters, piecing the story together as you go. The central story is set in a reality much like our own, but a fantastical side plot is introduced via a storytelling device reminiscent of The Princess Bride, The Fall, and several of Terry Gilliam's films. Certain scenes alter the color scheme of the display in ways relevant to the game's thematic content, cleverly weaving a (non-graphical) visual element into the formal tapestry of this text-based story-game. Photopia's unconventional approach to the form of IF suggests future possibilities in the medium.


Players:
While I wouldn't necessarily recommend Photopia to someone who has no experience whatsoever with traditional IF, it is easily simple enough for a beginner's second or third game. It's also unique enough that more experienced players will certainly not want to miss it.

Authors:
Take note, dissect, improve, imagine, code.


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