Home | Profile - Edit | Your Page | Your Inbox Browse | Search Games   |   Log In

Shade

by Andrew Plotkin profile

Travel
2000

Return to the game's main page

Reviews and Ratings

5 star:
(85)
4 star:
(113)
3 star:
(50)
2 star:
(9)
1 star:
(10)
Average Rating:
Number of Ratings: 267
Write a review


Previous | << 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >> | Next | Show All


- trojo (Huntsville, Alabama, USA), October 10, 2011

- o0pyromancer0o, September 30, 2011

2 of 7 people found the following review helpful:
No second chances, September 22, 2011
by Deboriole (San Diego, CA)
I enjoyed this game to a point. That point came when I became completely stuck and had to look at a walkthrough. Turns out I missed one opportunity and therefore could never solve the game. There was no indication that I was hopelessly stuck, so I rambled about for an hour until finally throwing in the towel. That did not make me very happy! There could be a simple solution to this...

(Spoiler - click to show)I really wish the helicopter would have come around again... I failed to look out the window in the two turns I had, and was not able to finish the game as a result.

- dacharya64, September 3, 2011

- r6144, August 6, 2011

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful:
The "Jacob's Ladder" of Interactive Fiction, August 3, 2011
by John Daily (New York)
There is a reason why, eleven years after its release, people are still playing (and discussing) Shade: It's a benchmark game. Beautiful in its elegance and completely immersive, its seemingly simplistic gameplay belies a sophisticated core.

The player begins in his (or her) apartment, several hours before embarking on a Burning Man-styled trip to the desert. The game starts off walking the player through mundane tasks, which serves two purposes: First, it eases the player into the game's vernacular; second, it puts him on comfortable footing, which is an important detail, as it makes the slow descent into its surreal Hell even more stark by contrast.

Designer/Writer Andrew Plotkin ensured that Shade can be enjoyed by players of all levels. A creatively implemented help system, woven into the story, walks the main character through tasks that need completion without being intrusive. For those who don't need such hand-holding, opting out is as simple a matter as not looking. For all its newbie-friendliness however, Shade features writing that works on several levels; statements that might initially elicit a chuckle become downright sinister as the game progresses.

I hesitate to call Shade a game, because the writing and pacing is so dead on (if you'll pardon the expression); although you will be ahead of things during the game's middle section, it's a necessary evil dictated by the plot, and it's safe to say this will not be the case as you progress toward the finale. Be forewarned however: if surrealism and ambiguity aren't your thing, then you may want to bypass this one. Shade is the Jacob's Ladder of the medium: not very scary while you're experiencing it, but it gets under your skin and stays there long after the word "END" appears on-screen.

- Digibomber, July 29, 2011

- LaFey (Porto, Portugal), July 15, 2011

- calindreams (Birmingham, England), July 14, 2011

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Surrealist IF at its best, July 6, 2011
by katz (Altadena, California)
Surrealist interactive fiction is largely an untapped resource, and this well-written and well-crafted little game shows what the genre is capable of. It's atmospheric, creepy, and suffused with a sense of inexorability that builds as the player finds him- or herself moving things along towards a foreboding conclusion.

The ambiguous ending frustrates a lot of players, but I appreciated it. It seems clear enough to me--the game isn't excessively complex--Plotkin just never states it overtly. Surely there's room in the canon for a few intentionally unresolved endings, and if they belong anywhere, it's in a surrealist game.

- rmg66fl, June 29, 2011

- Nemansphere, June 27, 2011

- Shchekotiki, June 23, 2011

- Jizaboz (U.S.A.), June 16, 2011

- flamingoboots, May 30, 2011

- baywoof, April 25, 2011

- Jonathan Blask (Milwaukee, WI, USA), April 4, 2011

- JohnW (Brno, Czech Republic), March 16, 2011

- spinnerin (Portland, OR), March 13, 2011

- frocutio (Irvine, CA), February 22, 2011

- diddlescatter (US), February 2, 2011

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Surreal, February 2, 2011
Odd, eerie, surrealistic, and foreboding, "Shade's" mood is its real attraction. The game's only "puzzle" is actually a very clever meta-puzzle; once you've noticed what all the significant commands in the game have in common, you'll get the gimmick and soon find yourself at the game's notorious ending.

- Elihu Jones, January 30, 2011

2 of 8 people found the following review helpful:
Shades of black and white?, January 28, 2011
by Aintelligence (Canada)
This is such a controversial game in so many different ways that I felt the need to weigh in my thoughts. I'll get this straight from the beginning so there's no confusion later. This game was in my mind an incredibly put together game. Arguably the best of Andrew Plotkin (although several others come to mind as well).

It is hard to write a review on this game without giving the whole story up, but I'll do my best.
I think that the two main strengths of the game are all related to character, and the links which are created throughout the game. Yes it's confusing and I played it twice to see all that I could learn (although I'm sure I could get more from it in my fourth or fifth time playing it.), but between these two elements, the game is worth the time.

The character is reLly the part of the plot in which I hate to spoil. I will say that plotkin, has really worked hard on making genuine emotion within the character. Every emotion is set out so well, (Spoiler - click to show) from genuine surprise, to a certain shrouded fear, to crazed terror and the downright craziness. the character not only has rapid changes of emotions, but I similarly was drawn into the story and experienced a wide range of emotions and wierdness. (Spoiler - click to show) of course it is the brain of the character which is in the end the most chilling part...

Secondly, the major strength of this piece is how, like a good puzzle, everything relates to each other in a dim, but in the end understandable, way. I think it is that dim sense that something isn't right even at the beginning of the adventure that was extremely compelling. Even further was how seemingly unexplainable things happened and felt vaguely related all
of the time. It really kept me on the edge of my seat. Many have said that it gets really tedious after a while of playing. Personally (maybe i'm just weird) I liked the timing of it very well. Nothing was forced, and it gave me a time to build up the suspense. (Spoiler - click to show) which for me started at the 'strange' vacuum scene.

I didn't really find too many weaknesses with this game, except maybe for the Different parts of the room which I wasn't very fond of. I will say this, it's very well done. Play it and play it more than once.

- NoiselessPenguin (London, UK), January 27, 2011


Previous | << 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >> | Next | Show All | Return to game's main page