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Light My Way Home

by Caelyn Sandel (as Venus Hart) profile

2014

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Reviews and Ratings

5 star:
(3)
4 star:
(3)
3 star:
(6)
2 star:
(2)
1 star:
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Average Rating:
Number of Ratings: 14
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1-14 of 14


- gilhova, July 25, 2017

- Sobol (Russia), June 22, 2016

- Emily Short, June 10, 2016

A melancholic story of longing and loss, May 11, 2016

by verityvirtue (London)
Related reviews: melancholic
Light My Way Home is a contemplative Shufflecomp entry set by a hydro corridor, and the landscape is unlikely: metal towers, scrabbly grass, abandoned barns. But in the midst of this comes a simple, lovely story of longing and loss.

Light My Way Home is a lovely sensory experience. The location descriptions are evocative; it features a quiet soundtrack punctuated by the chirping of crickets. This game revolves around a special command, >POWER OBJECT, which allows you to change the environment around you to guide the one NPC and, in so doing, find out more about yourself.

- E. W. B., February 23, 2016

- zeartless, February 6, 2016

- blue/green, July 15, 2014

- reholman, July 9, 2014

- MonochromeMolly, June 23, 2014

- NJ (Ontario), June 16, 2014

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Going Gentle, June 10, 2014
by Sam Kabo Ashwell (Seattle)
Light My Way Home is a simple, evocative little game. The unfolding of exactly what is going on is, I think, important to its emotional arc, so I'll avoid spoilers.

Knowing how to make use of empty space is a big deal in most artistic disciplines. Home is deft in how it employs the gaps often present in games: the dark loneliness of night-time in interstitial urban space, the gaps in recognition and memory, the unbridgeable distance between PC and NPC. It shows rather than tells, and doesn't overshow. It's able to do this without being frustratingly opaque, because the underlying story is quite simple; it is more of a tone piece than a plot or character piece. There is a small knack to interaction, and a little thought is required about how to progress, so the pacing is neither puzzly-slow nor trivially-rapid.

To some extent, it felt akin to a small, moody point-and-click 2D Flash adventure: the single mode of interaction, the genderless NPC who follows your actions rather than being explicitly directed, the atmospheric music and emphasis on lighting.

- Mr. Patient (Saint Paul, Minn.), June 4, 2014

- E.K., June 4, 2014

- Doug Orleans (Somerville, MA, USA), June 3, 2014


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