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Reviews by MathBrush

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View this member's reviews by tag: 10+ hours 15-30 minutes 2-10 hours about 1 hour about 2 hours IF Comp 2015 Infocom less than 15 minutes Spring Thing 2016
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Wrenlaw, by Ryan Veeder

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Moving and confusing, detailed and short. A memory game, July 22, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: 15-30 minutes
This is my final review for the Official Ryan Vedder Weekend Review Contest with guaranteed prize, giving me a score of 8 (due to having reviewed the other games earlier). Due to lack of publicity, the contest has been extended until Monday night at midnight Moscow time. Just post your Veeder reviews on ifdb (the Veedercomp games also count). 2nd and 3rd place winners get something too.

This game confused me at first; I didn't Get the mechanic that advances the game until my second playthrough.

You are in a park, looking for a geocache. There is a satisfying trash minigame.

I found it touching; if it is a parody, they say that parodies of extremism are indistinguishable from extremism, so the extreme schmalziness is something I enjoyed.

I love this game, but it was too hard to figure out how to progress (it's probably my fault for not reading the text after a major hint in my first playthrough, but oh well).

The Roscovian Palladium, by Ryan Veeder
A game about a tiny rat in a big world, with creepy museum things, July 22, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: 15-30 minutes
This review is part of the Official Ryan Veeder Weekend Review Exposium with Guaranteed Prize.

For some reason, when I saw this game, I didn't want to play it. Then many people reviewed it, and I still didn't want to play it. It seemed like it would be confusing with a lot of red herrings.

Then I tried it, and stopped, because I am overwhelmed by red herrings and use walkthroughs on every game.

Then I had to write a review for this exposium, and I played it. The writing is great. Unplugging the router was a joy in itself, despite its lack of gameplay effect. The juxtaposition of the wooden caterpillar with the other objects in its room frightened me (I think I thought it was on the bed?).

The combat was satisfying once I worked it out, and conversation was surprisingly good.

This is a good game, but it stressed me out due to my gaming style.

Craverly Heights, by Ryan Veeder
A short game with a twist and good source code, July 22, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: less than 15 minutes
This review is for the Official Ryan Veeder Weekend Review Salon with Guaranteed Prize.

This Ryan Veeder game had me very confused, and then pleased, then more confused; then I read the source code, nodded, and understood.

You play a doctor trying to help a sick patient named Pauline. You are in a small hospital that is very... unusual, to say the least, in its geography.

The lack of cluing got to me, though, and the strong branching made each playthrough less memorable.

But the twist was pleasant.

So, You've Never Played a Text Adventure Before, Huh?, by Ryan Veeder

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
A Robin and Orchid spinoff as a tutorial, July 22, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: 15-30 minutes
This review is part of the Official Ryan Veeder Weekend Review Communal Effort with Guaranteed Prize.

This is a spin-off of Robin and Orchid. You are investigating a haunted house, and fall down a hole.

The best part of the game is the demonstration of the three main methods of conversation.

The least best part of the game is the hinting. While it is generally good, there were times where the hints just kind of kicked out at important moments. The inexperienced adventurer that I was playing as got frustrated at not, for instance, knowing how to get through the door.

I enjoyed the ending considerably, though.

Someone Keeps Moving My Chair, by Ryan Veeder
A short game with well-implemented NPCs and a layered story., July 22, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: 15-30 minutes
This review is for The Official Ryan Veeder Weekend Review Tournament with Guaranteed Prize.

This game is a prequel to The Statue Got Me High, but you don't need to have played the latter game.

It contains classic elements of the Veeder mythos, such as red herrings, consumable food, actions that seem simple but maybe take a little longer to type than the other anticipated but you never know, and NPCs whose tone of voice is in direct contrast to the content of their conversations.

This game makes a 5 on my scale, but only barely. According to my criteria, it is polished (no bugs here), descriptive (why not?), has an emotional investment (I hated Edward), the interactivity is okay (I had to decompile it once, but I wanted to decompile it, so that's something), and I would play it again.

But it just scraped by in each category, so it might not be as good as a 4 star game that did great in one category.

The Case of LeAnne's Missing Bunny, Wendy, by Ryan Veeder

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
A briefly earnest parody of an earnest scary story about a bunny, July 21, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: 15-30 minutes
This review is part of the Official Ryan Veeder Weekend Review Competition with Guaranteed Prize.

In this game, entered in the Haunted House Jam, you play (in 3rd person) a (winsome) character named something with an SH that I forgot.

There is a small map, and a puzzle involving a stick (which was listed as a rope in the inventory) that failed to draw me in.

However, the quality of the writing was par, and the experience with the dark figure and the other experience with the empty bedroom were vaguely similar to experiences I've had. I would play it again.

The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, by Ryan Veeder and Edgar Allan Poe

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
A fairly well written faintly recalled memory of a fable by Poe, July 21, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: less than 15 minutes
This review is part of the Official Ryan Veeder Weekend Review Challenge with Guaranteed Prize.

In this game, our intrepid author programs an entire game without a single (actually, with A single) glance at the source material.

The source material was, from the recollection, somewhat disturbing, but the retelling is much more disturbing if approached in the right vein. Have you ever faintly recalled a movie, or story, or dream from your youth that deeply disturbed you? I have half-recollected versions of both It and Castle in the Sky that are much more haunting than the original.

That's what this game is; it condenses all of the most disturbing parts of the game. What's disturbing is not the game, but what it reveals about the human mind, about Veeder's mind, about the things that his brain decided to store up for the future.

Le butin du Capitaine Verdeterre, by Ryan Veeder

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Has substantially more French than the original, July 21, 2017
by MathBrush
Related reviews: 15-30 minutes
This review is part of the Official Ryan Veeder Weekend Review Contest with Guaranteed Prize.

While I was alarmed by the 'vitesse alarmante' of the 'eau' entering my ship, I was able to escape towards 'la poupe'.

While the addition of extra French improved the game considerably, it had no effect on pre-existing French. I would have preferred seeing Capitaine Earthworm or some other variation thereof.

Carma, by Marnie Parker
An animated comic about commas, July 16, 2017
This is a pretty fun comic to watch, but has very little interactivity. It worked for me in-browser.

It's essentially an animated comic about a comma who really doesn't like you. In each scene, you can mostly wait until the next scene, but you can also try a few basically well-cued actions. There is a scene or two, though, with really badly cued actions.

The Chasing, by Anssi Räisänen
A charming and pleasant search for 7 lost horses, July 16, 2017
Räisänen definitely has their own style of puzzle, in this and other games.

In this game, you are a nobleman who has lost seven horses, and who has been asked to find them, as well as delivering invitations.

The puzzle design rests on light puzzles mostly focusing on examining, waiting, and movement, similar to Arthur DiBianca's later games.


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